Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

STRESS : STRESS

Sumissioin : submit your manuscript
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse articles > Previous issues
12 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 30(4); December 2022
Prev issue Next issue
Review Article
Research Trends in the Diagnostic Classification of Food Addiction and Future Tasks
Juwon Lee, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2022;30(4):187-195.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.187
  • 1,574 View
  • 140 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
Although people tend to be exposed to food addiction today, there are no formal diagnostics for Food Addiction. Thus, clinical application for therapy is difficult. The present study reviews the clinical characteristics, mechanisms, and measurement tools, and presents opinions on psychiatric classification to suggest directions for further research.
Methods
The authors conducted a literature search using the terms food addiction or FA. The review included 54 Korea and international studies from 1956 to 2021.
Results
Food addiction has reported similarities with substance use disorder and binge eating disorder. Consequently, it seems to be more reasonable to categorize it as substance or behavioral addiction rather than an eating disorder. Further research is needed on whether food addiction can be classified as a behavioral addiction in that food does not have intoxication properties by itself. Further, it is worth considering the dimensional classification of binge-eating-related spectrum disorder, given the behavioral similarities.
Conclusions
Several studies have attempted to reveal the characteristics of food addiction, but researchers’ views on the psychiatric classification are inconsistent. The addition of food addiction in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (DSM) seems to require a phased approach. Further work should also verify the effective treatment methods, focusing on underlying mechanism.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of the nutrition quotient by types of eating behavior among male and female university students in Gwangju
    Geum-Bi Ryu, Young-Ran Heo
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2023; 56(3): 277.     CrossRef
Original Articles
The Relationship between Evaluative Compartmentalization of Self-Structure and Psychological Health
Jewon Bang, Ah Young Lim
STRESS. 2022;30(4):196-203.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.196
  • 820 View
  • 78 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Evaluative compartmentalization is the tendency to segregate positively and negatively valenced self-beliefs into separate self-aspects. This study examined whether there were differences in reflection and personal growth based on the level of evaluative compartmentalization and differential importance.
Methods
A total of 296 undergraduate and graduate students reported self-aspect test, and answered questions about reflection and personal growth via online surveys. The participants were divided based on the level (high or low) of evaluative compartmentalization and differential importance. The effects of evaluative compartmentalization and differential importance on the dependent variables were examined. The data were analyzed using two-way multivariate analysis of covariance (two-way MANCOVA).
Results
The main effect of evaluative compartmentalization was significant for reflection and personal growth. The main effect of differential importance was significant for personal growth. The interaction effect of evaluative compartmentalization and differential importance was insignificant for any dependent variable.
Conclusions
The findings suggest a need for intervention for integrating self-concept structure and improving differential importance for graduate and undergraduate students.
Qualitative Study on Experiences of Suicidal Ideation and Behavior among College Students
Donghee Jeong, Eun-Jung Shim
STRESS. 2022;30(4):204-212.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.204
  • 1,447 View
  • 102 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Suicide is a major cause of death among young adults, and elucidating their experiences of suicidal behavior is important in suicide prevention. This study aimed to explore the factors related to suicidal ideation and behavior in college students. Students’ responses and coping strategies for distress caused by these factors were also explored.
Methods
The study conducted semi-structured interview with 24 college students (mean age=21.3, 75% female) who were at elevated risk of suicide. The transcripts were analyzed based on the consensual qualitative research method.
Results
The participants reported experiencing repeated frustrations in pursuing academic and career paths, as well as social isolation, conflict, or social comparison. In response to these stressors, they experienced negative emotions, such as depression and feeling of being a burden. Negative thoughts about the self and future also emerged. A lack of understanding of why they experienced distress and how to manage the distress led the participants to engage in maladaptive responses, such as avoidance. These factors contributed to increasing their risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. Meanwhile, the factors that deterred them from making a lethal suicide attempt were their lack of capability, their concern about their family and friends, and social support from the latter.
Conclusions
Repeated frustration and interpersonal distress were major factors related to increased suicidal ideation and behavior in college students. Suicide prevention in young adults may benefit from addressing negative impact of these factors.
Future Orientation’s Influence on Smartphone Overdependence among Out-of-School Adolescents: Focusing on the Moderated Mediation Effect of Depression by Parental Emotional Support
RaeHyuck Lee
STRESS. 2022;30(4):213-220.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.213
  • 779 View
  • 48 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to examine the influence of future orientation on smartphone overdependence through depression among out-of-school adolescents and the moderated mediation effect of parental emotional support.
Methods
This study analyzed data from the Panel Survey of School Dropouts with the Process macro Models 4 and 14.
Results
First, out-of-school adolescents’ future orientation negatively influenced smartphone overdependence. Second, out-of-school adolescents’ depression partially mediated the influence of future orientation on smartphone overdependence. Third, out-of-school adolescents’ parental emotional support moderated the mediation effect of future orientation on smartphone overdependence through depression.
Conclusions
The results suggest ways to manage smartphone overdependence among out-of-school adolescents.
Variables Associated with Self-Compassion among Nurses: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Bokeung Peun, Heeseung Choi
STRESS. 2022;30(4):221-233.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.221
  • 1,659 View
  • 114 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to identify variables associated with nurses’ self-compassion and assess their effect sizes through a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.
Methods
Domestic and foreign literature were searched using the Prisma flow diagram; 17 papers were systematically reviewed, and 12 papers underwent meta-analysis.
Results
A total of 29 variables related to nurses’ self-compassion were extracted from the analyzed papers. Furthermore, 12 sub-variables of individual characteristics and 17 sub-variables of job and organizational characteristics were identified. The effect sizes were divided into positive and negative variables to estimate the strength of the relationship between variables related to nurses’ self-compassion. All positive variables showed a small effect size (effect size (ES)= .25). Among the positive variables, quality of life (ES=.45), which had a medium effect size, was most related to self-compassion. Conversely, all negative variables showed a medium effect size (ES=−.35). The negative variable most related to self-compassion was burnout (ES=−.48).
Conclusions
The results suggest that promoting self-compassion is essential as it relates to nurses’ work, mental health, and quality of life. Further studies are needed to verify the mediating effects of self-compassion between stressful events and mental health among nurses. Additionally, it is necessary to develop and apply an intervention related to nurses’ self-compassion that increases the effect of positive variables and decreases the impact of negative variables.
The Relation between Social Anxiety, Self-Focused Attention and State Anxiety: The Moderated Mediation Effect of the Self-image on a Screen
TaeHo Um, Mirihae Kim, Jung-Ho Kim
STRESS. 2022;30(4):234-243.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.234
  • 1,064 View
  • 52 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study examined how seeing one’s own image during video communication affects the cognitive process of social anxiety.
Methods
Fifty-two university students were recruited and assessed for social anxiety and dispositional self-focused attention. They were randomly assigned to different exposure and size settings of self-images on a screen (none, middle, big). Subsequently, a simulated video interview was conducted. During the experiment, changes in state anxiety (subjective anxiety, heart rate) and state self-focused attention were assessed.
Results
First, self-focused attention mediated the effect of social anxiety on subjective anxiety. Second, the mediation effect of state self-focused attention on social anxiety’s influence on subjective anxiety was not moderated by the exposure and size of the self-image on the screen. Third, the mediation effect of dispositional self-focused attention on social anxiety’s influence on subjective anxiety was moderated by the exposure and size of the self-image on the screen. The moderated mediation effects of the exposure and size of the self-image on the screen were significant for middle and big sizes.
Conclusions
These findings suggest that dispositional self-focused attention—a cognitive characteristic of social anxiety—can interact with the exposure and size of a self-image on a screen, causing higher anxiety.
The Role of Disability Acceptance and Emotional Support in the Association between Negative Experiences and Depression in Disabled People with Cancer: A Moderated Mediation Model
Young Won Shin, Min Jin Jin, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2022;30(4):244-251.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.244
  • 1,189 View
  • 40 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
This study examined the moderating effect of emotional support from acquaintances and the mediating effect of disability acceptance in the association between disability-related negative experiences and depression in disabled people with cancer.
Methods
Data were collected from 295 participants in the“Disabled-Life Panel Research” conducted by the Korea Disabled people’s Development Institute. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS Windows 26.0 with the PROCESS Macro program 4.0 as a moderated mediating model.
Results
Higher disability-related negative experiences caused lower disability acceptance, which predicted higher depression levels. Emotional support played a significant moderating role in this relationship. The effect of negative experiences on disability acceptance was weaker in disabled individuals with cancer who perceived higher social support from acquaintances.
Conclusions
These results suggest that focusing on emotional support is important in protecting the psychological health of disabled people with cancer who are alienated from society.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Disability acceptance and depressive symptoms: the moderating role of social support
    Gum-Ryeong Park, Sujeong Park, Jinho Kim
    Disability and Rehabilitation.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
Factors Influencing COVID-19 Stress among Tertiary Hospital Workers
So Yeon Kim, Ji Sook Kang
STRESS. 2022;30(4):252-259.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.252
  • 1,228 View
  • 42 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
The study aimed to identify the level of and factors influencing stress experienced by tertiary hospital workers related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and provide a foundation to develop a systematic stress-relief intervention program.
Methods
This descriptive study conducted a questionnaire survey using the Korean version of the COVID-19 Stress Scale. The participants were medical workers, medical technicians, office workers, and other occupational groups in two tertiary general hospitals in J province of Korea with more than six months of work experience. Data were collected from November 2021 to December 2021.
Results
The results indicated that being male, being a healthcare provider, such as doctor or nurse, and income dissatisfaction were significant influencing factors of COVID-19 stress. The independent variables explained the dependent variable by 14.5%. The job category was the most influencing factor, and healthcare providers exhibited significantly less stress than office workers.
Conclusions
Therefore, appropriate education, systematic and differentiated stress management, and policy efforts are required to relieve COVID-19-related stress among tertiary hospital workers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Study on the Influences of the COVID-19 Pandemic-related Depression, Anxiety, Stress, and Treatment-Crisis on Quality of Life in Cancer Patients
    So Hyoung Kim, Kyung Hee Lim
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2023; 23(1): 19.     CrossRef
The Effect of Directed Avoidance on Impulsive Behaviors among Individuals with Traits of Borderline Personality Disorder
Hoi Jin Yoon, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2022;30(4):260-267.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.260
  • 1,584 View
  • 39 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aims to examine the emotion regulation effect of directed avoidance on the impulsive behavior of individuals with traits of borderline personality disorder (BPD).
Methods
A total of 44 participants with BPD traits were randomly assigned to the control group (n=22) and treatment group (n=22). Participants in the treatment group were directed to use avoidance when they experienced a negative emotion. Positive and negative emotions and impulsivity were measured before and after the negative emotion was induced; impulsivity was measured using the Stroop test and Contingency Delay task.
Results
The Stroop test’s results demonstrated that there was a significant interaction effect of time and error between the groups, specifically, impulsivity increased in the control group when negative emotions were induced. However, the results of Contingency Delay task were marginally significant. The main effect of directed avoidance on discount rate k slightly increased but did not reach a significant level, and the interaction effect between the groups and time was not found. In the control group, discount rate k significantly increased after directed avoidance was induced; however, it was not significant in the treatment group.
Conclusions
Findings from our study supported the effect of directed avoidance could be used as an emotional regulation method among individuals with traits of BPD, such as controlling impulsive behaviors. Finally, limitations of this study and implications of the short-term intervention method using the immediate emotional control effect of directed avoidance for the future are discussed.
The Effect of Threatening Stimuli on Attentional Blink
Yunjung Kwon, Yunkyeung Choi
STRESS. 2022;30(4):268-276.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.268
  • 1,183 View
  • 34 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to identify the effect of momentary Attentional Blink (AB) in temporarily stressful situations to reveal the relationship between emotion and attention after a traumatic experience.
Methods
Participants were 57 college students randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=30) that watched news videos depicting disasters or a control group (n=27) that did not watch them. This was followed by the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) task for both groups. AB appeared when T1 was a news threat stimulus for the experimental and control group; the shorter the presentation interval between T1 and T2, the stronger the AB. On the other hand, when news-neutral stimuli were presented in T1, the AB pattern between the groups changed. The AB pattern appeared regardless of the type of word presented to the control group in T1; however, in the experimental group, the AB pattern appeared only when the news-neutral word was presented in T1.
Results
The results suggest that AB appears when T1 is a traumatic stimulus. However, when T1 is a conditioned traumatic stimulus, the AB pattern varies depending on whether the participant watched the disaster video.
Conclusions
Our results expand on existing studies by confirming the AB effect in trauma-related neutral stimuli and trauma stimuli.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effect of Cognitive Processing Style on Attentional Blink during Analogue Trauma
    Ye Ji Son, Yun-Kyeung Choi
    STRESS.2024; 32(1): 38.     CrossRef
Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Job-Seeking Stress, Self-Efficacy, Experiential Avoidance, Depression, and Anxiety
Geon Min Lee, Hyun Kyun Shin
STRESS. 2022;30(4):277-287.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.277
  • 1,092 View
  • 59 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an effective intervention for stress, self-efficacy, and experiential avoidance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ACT on job-seeking stress, self-efficacy, experiential avoidance, depression, and anxiety.
Methods
University students suffering from job-seeking stress were recruited for this study. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group (12 students) and a wait-list control group (10 students). The ACT program consisted of six 120-minute sessions conducted twice a week for three weeks. A pre-test, post-test, and follow-up test (4 weeks after the final session) were administered.
Results
In the experimental group, positive significant effects were identified for all variables, and these effects were maintained at the time of the follow-up test. In the wait-list control group, a temporary positive effect was identified for job-seeking stress and self-efficacy, but had disappeared by the follow-up test; no changes were identified for the remaining variables.
Conclusions
The significance of this study is confirmed that ACT is effective not only stress but also for job-seeking stress and other variables.
Recalibrating Negative Weighting Biases through Risk-Taking Manipulation in College Students with High Rejection Sensitivity: Focusing on Instruction Type
Mi Eun Choi, Hyae Young Yoon
STRESS. 2022;30(4):288-297.   Published online December 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.4.288
  • 571 View
  • 18 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to examine negative weighting biases in risk-taking situations and recalibrate the negative weighting biases using Bean Fest training among college students with high levels of rejection sensitivity.
Methods
Participants were college students who were randomly assigned to one of three groups: an implicit instruction group, an integrated instruction group, and a control group. In the recalibration condition, participants were informed whether each classification was correct or not, thus recalibrating the valence weighting bias. The integrated instruction group was given a strategic message to recalibrate the negative weighting bias explicitly, while the implicit instruction group was given a message that allowed them to determine the more effective method based on their own response.
Results
Both treatment groups recalibrated the negative weighing bias effectively. In addition, the level of rejection sensitivity in the integrated instruction group was significantly reduced compared to that of the implicit instruction group.
Conclusions
This result suggests that Bean Fest training is effective in recalibrating the negative weighting bias and reducing rejection sensitivity among college students. The limitations of this study and suggestions for subsequent research are discussed.

STRESS : STRESS