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Original Articles
Time Management, Quality of Life, and Work-Life Balance Based on Temperament of Workers
Yuseung Choi, Yejin Cho, Yeeun Hwang, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2022;30(2):69-74.   Published online June 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.2.69
  • 241 View
  • 22 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Temperament plays an important role in adapting to different environments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences between temperament clusters, time management behavior, quality of life, and work-life balance.
Methods
A total of 216 participants (male=56, female=160, mean age: 31.92 years) completed questionnaires measuring temperament, time management behavior, quality of life, and work-life balance.
Results
Data from the study shows that temperamental profiles are classified into three groups. The profile of “Adaptive Solver” was associated with the most beneficial traits, and that of “Chronic Worrier” was associated with the most disadvantageous traits.
Conclusions
The findings of this study confirm that temperaments are related to psychological adjustment. This study provides an implication for considering individual differences in the intervention for psychological adaptation of workers.
The Parallel Multiple Mediating Effects of Work-Family Conflict and Loneliness in the Relationship between Temperaments, Depression, and Anxiety while Working from Home
Yeeun Hwang, Yejin Cho, Yuseung Choi, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2022;30(2):75-84.   Published online June 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.2.75
  • 192 View
  • 15 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
As the number of people working from home has increased since the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to understand workers’ stress and psychological state while working from home. Work-family conflict and loneliness may be related to working from home, and they could be experienced differently depending on individual traits. Therefore, this study examined the parallel multiple mediating effects of work-family conflict and loneliness in the relationship between personal temperaments and negative emotions such as depression and anxiety.
Methods
Data were collected online from people currently working from home for at least one month, more than once per week. They answered K-DASS-21, UCLA loneliness scale, Work-Family Conflict, and FCB-TI. Only four temperaments were used in the statistic step: Briskness and Sense sensitivity as protective factors and Perseveration and Emotional reactivity as vulnerable factors. The multiple mediating effects were analyzed independently by using the PROCESS macro.
Results
Firstly, Briskness and Sense sensitivity were found to negatively affect depression and anxiety while working from home by significantly mediating work-family conflict and loneliness. Thus, these temperaments would be protective factors while working from home. Secondly, Perseveration and Emotional reactivity positively influenced both negative emotions by mediating two mediation variables, which means that both temperaments are vulnerable factors.
Conclusions
The results suggest that personality traits can impact how people experience stress and negative emotions in working situations, leading to negative psychological states. Consequently, personal temperaments would be important to understand relationships between environments and internal experiences.
The Experience of Killing and Health in Late Life: Findings from Korean Vietnam War Veterans
Hyunyup Lee, Sungrok Kang
STRESS. 2022;30(2):85-91.   Published online June 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.2.85
  • 141 View
  • 10 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
The current study aimed to examine the effects of combat exposure and killing on mental and subjective physical health later in life among Korean Vietnam War veterans.
Methods
The data were collected from 342 male veterans with a mean age of 72 years (SD=2.57). Veterans were divided based on their histories into three groups: no experience (Group 1), combat exposure only (Group 2), and both killing and combat exposure (Group 3). Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) examined group differences in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, anxiety symptoms, hostility, and perceived physical health.
Results
The ANOVAs showed that PTSD, anxiety symptoms and hostility were most prevalent among the veterans in Group 3 (both killing and combat exposure). No significant differences were found between Groups 1 and 2. Perceived physical health was highest among the veterans in Group 1 (no experience). There were no differences between Groups 2 and 3. Even after controlling for the impacts of optimism and social support after homecoming, these results were similar.
Conclusions
The findings indicate that killing experience and combat exposure should be considered in designing interventions for veterans deployed into active combat zones.
The Influence of Mothers’ Acculturative Stress on Adolescents' Depression in Multicultural Families: The Moderating Effect of Sex
RaeHyuck Lee
STRESS. 2022;30(2):92-97.   Published online June 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.2.92
  • 155 View
  • 10 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
With the increasing number of multicultural adolescents, concerns about their healthy development are also on the rise. This study aimed to examine the influence of mothers’ acculturative stress on adolescents’ depression in multicultural families with respect to the moderating effect of sex.
Methods
A series of regression analyses were conducted using a sample of 1,052 adolescents from multicultural families composed of a foreign-born mother and a Korean father based on the 9th wave of the Multicultural Adolescents Panel Study (MAPS).
Results
First, foreign-born mothers’ acculturative stress positively and significantly influenced adolescents’ depression. When the level of acculturative stress increased, so did the level of depression. Second, the influence of mothers’ acculturative stress on adolescents’ depression was moderated by sex. The influence was larger for female than for male adolescents.
Conclusions
Based on its findings, this study discussed intervention strategies to address depression among multicultural adolescents.
Influence of Subjective Gambling Norms and Big-Win/Big-Loss Experiences on Severity of Gambling Behavior
Jungwoo Park, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2022;30(1):1-6.   Published online March 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.1.1
  • 763 View
  • 63 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of subjective gambling norms and big-win/big-loss experiences on the severity of gambling behavior.
Methods
A total of 330 participants responded to a questionnaire assessing subjective gambling norms, severity of gambling behavior, and big-win and big-loss experiences.
Results
Subjective gambling norms and big-loss experiences had a significant positive impact on gambling severity. However, the interaction effects of subjective gambling norms and big-loss experiences on gambling severity were not significant.
Conclusions
The results of this study can facilitate an improved understanding of the path of gambling addiction. Further, the findings clarify the implications of interventions pertaining to subjective gambling norms and big-loss experiences.

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