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Volume 31(1); March 2023
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Original Articles
The Effect of Perceived Stress on Drinking Problem of Korean College Students: From the Perspective of Escape Theory
Dawon Yoon, Youngho Lee
STRESS. 2023;31(1):1-10.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.1.1
  • 2,084 View
  • 146 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study examined how the perceived stress of college students leads to drinking problems based on the Escape Theory.
Methods
A total of 485 college students were surveyed. A moderated mediation analysis was used to test the hypotheses.
Results
Since no significant correlation was found between perceived stress and drinking problem, the dependent variable was replaced with problematic drinking, a sub-factor of drinking problem. Escape from self fully mediated the relationship between perceived stress and problematic drinking. The interaction of perceived stress and dysfunctional self-focus was correlated with escape from self. Coping motives to drinking strengthened the pathways from escape from self to problematic drinking.
Conclusions
This study shows the need for therapeutic interventions to curb college students’ drinking problems. This study’s significance and limitations are also discussed.
Effects of Social Anxiety Level on Negative Interpretation Bias in Ambiguous Social Situations: Focused on Relational Intimacy
Hye Ji Yun, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2023;31(1):11-17.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.1.11
  • 1,766 View
  • 64 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to examine the differences in negative interpretation bias in ambiguous social situations according to social anxiety level and then confirm the degree of negative interpretation bias according to the relational intimacy with the interacting partner.
Methods
A total of 405 adults in their 20s completed the surveys that measured the levels of social interaction anxiety, and the highest 10% (n=30) and lowest 10% (n=30) scorers finally participated in the study. This study used a 2 (high/low social anxiety)×3 (relational intimacy: a stranger/a moderately intimate person/a very intimate person) factorial design. The study provided participants with 15 randomized scenarios with the same social context but different interacting partners and confirmed the degree of agreement with the negative interpretation presented in each situation.
Results
The high social anxiety group showed more negative interpretation bias in ambiguous social situations compared to the low social anxiety group. Regarding the negative interpretation biases according to relational intimacy, the high social anxiety group showed the most negative interpretation bias in social interactions with a moderately intimate person than they did with a stranger or very intimate person.
Conclusions
Social anxiety may have different effects on the degree of negative interpretation bias depending on intimacy in social interactions, suggesting that differentiated therapeutic interventions are needed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Unmet expectations: social inclusion and the interaction between social anxiety and ambiguous or positive feedback
    Rémi Thériault, Flavie Dion-Cliche, Stéphane Dandeneau
    Frontiers in Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
The Effect of Parents’ Negative Parenting Style on Aggression among Adolescents: The Mediating Effect of Self-Esteem and Smartphone Dependency
Eun Jung Bae, Soo-Hyun Nam
STRESS. 2023;31(1):18-24.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.1.18
  • 2,639 View
  • 102 Download
  • 2 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
This study investigates the serial mediation of self-esteem and smartphone dependency in the relationship between negative parenting style and adolescents’ aggression.
Methods
We conducted a secondary data analysis of the 2018 Korean Children and Youth Panel Survey (KCYPS) and used the data of first-year middle school students. A mediation analysis was conducted using Hayes’ SPSS PROCESS Macro (Model 6).
Results
The mediation of smartphone dependency was significant in the relationship between parents’ negative parenting style and aggression, but the mediation of self-esteem was not. Negative parenting style significantly affected adolescents’ aggression through the sequential mediation of self-esteem and smartphone dependency.
Conclusions
Appropriate interventions should be prepared to help adolescents increase their self-esteem and reduce smartphone dependency, thus reducing the aggression that a negative parenting style induces.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Correlation between Parental Hostility and Child Self-Control and Aggression
    Sun Yee Yoo, Hye Young Ahn
    Healthcare.2023; 11(17): 2433.     CrossRef
  • Moderating Effects of Emotional Recognition Competency in Rejective Parenting and Adolescent Depression and Aggression
    Jaeeun Shin, Sung Man Bae
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(18): 6775.     CrossRef
Test Linking of Suicide Risk Assessment Instruments: Comparing Cut-Off Scores for Suicide Risk
Hwajeong Yu, Yuhwa Han, Sungeun You
STRESS. 2023;31(1):25-36.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.1.25
  • 4,834 View
  • 160 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Communicating the objective meaning of the cut-off criteria for high-risk among suicide risk assessment tools is challenging because they measure different aspects of suicide risk. This study aimed to provide comparable scores among widely used suicide assessment instruments by using test linking.
Methods
Linking was performed using the equipercentile method with the data of 400 adults. Then, for an independent sample of 165 adults, the validity of linking was tested by providing an overall percent agreement of group classification.
Results
Linking results indicated that the score of 4 on the C-SSRS corresponded to 8 on the DSI-SS and 16 on the SBQ-R, respectively. The overall percent agreement of group classification based on the cutoff score of 4 on the C-SSRS was high in both scales, supporting the validity of linking.
Conclusions
The study results provide comparable criteria for the high-risk group among the three measures. Mental health practitioners could utilize our results in identifying people at high suicide risk.
Influence of Parenting Stress on Depression among Single Parents with Preschool Children during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Focusing on the Moderating Effect of Self-rated Health Status
RaeHyuck Lee
STRESS. 2023;31(1):37-43.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.1.37
  • 1,102 View
  • 58 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to verify the influence of parental stress on depression among single parents with preschool children during the COVID-19 pandemic and the moderating effect of self-rated health status.
Methods
The study conducted regression analyses with a sample of 335 single parents raising children under seven years old from the raw data of the Study on the Status of Sole-parent Families conducted by the Korean Ministry of Gender Equality and Family in 2021.
Results
Single parents’ parenting stress had a positive and significant influence on their depression, moderated by their self-rated health status. That is, the influence of parenting stress on depression was more pronounced for parents who rated their health status as not good compared with those who rated their health status as good.
Conclusions
Based on the findings, the discussion suggested interventions for dealing with depression among single parents with preschool children.
The Double-Mediating Effect of Interpersonal Competence and Social Support on the Relationship between ADHD Traits and Depression in Early Adulthood
Jae Sun An
STRESS. 2023;31(1):44-50.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.1.44
  • 1,472 View
  • 118 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aims to analyze the relationship between interpersonal competence, social support, ADHD traits, and depression in early adulthood, and by using the double-mediation model, to examine the effect of the first two variables on the last two.
Methods
The participants comprised 146 male and 155 female adults aged between 19 and 34, from whom data was collected through the Korean version of the WHO Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale, interpersonal competence and depression subscales of the mental health test developed by Suh et al., and social support scale developed by Iverson et al.
Results
The results showed that adult ADHD traits were negatively correlated with interpersonal competence and social support, and positively correlated with depression. In addition, interpersonal competence was positively correlated with social support and negatively correlated with depression, whereas social support was negatively correlated with depression. Finally, interpersonal competence and social support sequentially mediated adult ADHD traits and depression.
Conclusions
This sequential double-mediating effect is of great academic significance and suggests that improving interpersonal competence and social support may be effective in mitigating the negative effect of ADHD traits on depression in early adulthood.

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