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Volume 27(2); June 2019
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Original Articles
Predictors for Incidence of Delirium after Musculoskeletal Operation in Elderly Patients
Unjong Choi, Sun Ja Kim, Ji Sook Kang
STRESS. 2019;27(2):139-145.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.139
  • 148 View
  • 1 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study was purpose to identify predictors for incidence of delirium after musculoskeletal operation in elderly patients.

Methods:

A total of 104 elderly patients over 65 years with musculoskeletal operation was participated in this study. After IRB approval, the study period was between April and August, 2017, and the data were collected using by structured questionnaires (MMSE-K, GDSSF-K, Nu-DESC). Collected data were analyzed by descriptive analysis, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation, and logistic regression using SPSS 22.0 statistical program.

Results:

The average score of participant’s cognition and depression were 24.85±4.51, 5.27±1.80. 34 (32.7%) participants had cognitive impairment and 83 (79.5%) participant were ruled out depression. As cognitive function, there were significant differences in gender, age, marital status, education, job, house and caregiver. As depression, there were significant differences by aids, operation history and perceived health. There were significantly negative correlations cognitive impairment and depression. The incidence of delirium in participants was 21.2%. During post operation three day, the incident rate of delirium over 9%. The strong predictor was cognitive impairment for incidence of delirium after musculoskeletal operation in participants.

Conclusions:

Therefore, it is suggested that geriatric nursing intervention for strengthening cognition of musculoskeletal operation in elderly patients.

Sex Differences in Pain Caused by Stretching and Decrease in Pain Over Time
Wootaek Lim
STRESS. 2019;27(2):146-151.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.146
  • 151 View
  • 3 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

Repeated strong contraction and relaxation of muscles during exercise can cause tension in the muscle tendon unit. The physical stress caused by tension on muscle tissue is closely linked to pain. This study evaluated sex differences in pain after stretching of hamstring muscles and the decrease in pain over time.

Methods:

Hamstring flexibility was measured with an active knee extension test before and after stretching. Pain was measured using the visual analogue scale immediately after stretching, on day 1, and day 2.

Results:

Pain reported by men was higher than that reported by women, but the difference was not significant. The pain reported by both men and women was significantly decreased on day 1, with a smaller decrease on day 2. There was no correlation between the increase in flexibility and pain.

Conclusions:

Pain did not differ between men and women. Additionally, pain was not simply determined by intensity of stretching. Individual characteristics and other factors must also be considered.

Self-Control, Depression and Eating Attitude according to Weight Control Behavior in College Women
Sunkyung Cha, Geunmyun Kim, Eunmi Lee
STRESS. 2019;27(2):152-157.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.152
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  • 2 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the self-control, depression, and eating attitude according to weight control behaviors, and to develop intervention for education and counseling for weight control of female college students and healthy weight control behaviors.

Methods:

It was cross-sectional descriptive study conducted for female college students. A total of 376 completed responses were collected and analyzed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a linear model using demographic characteristics as a control variable.

Results:

This study were as follows. The self-control was higher in the cases of regular exercise and reducing of meal than fast or meal skip in the main weight control behavior. The risk of eating disorder in fast or meal skip was higher than that of reducing of meal.

Conclusions:

Based on these results, it is necessary to implement customized education and counseling according to weight control behaviors for healthy weight control behavior. A program should be planned to improve self-control, reduce depression, and manage the risk of ingestion disability for the fast or meal skip group.

The Effects of School-Related Stress on Early Adolescents’ Subjective Well-Being: Focusing on Gender and Age Differences
Seon Ok Son
STRESS. 2019;27(2):158-165.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.158
  • 127 View
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Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among school-related stress, school trust, community participation and subjective well-being. And additional analysis was to examine how different they were between gender and age group structural relationships and mediating effects.

Methods:

Data from “Korean Survey on the Rights of Youth and Children in 2015” was utilized for the analysis. The sample consisted of 6449 students in their 11~16 age. This study analyzed using Structural Equation Model and Multi-group analysis.

Results:

Major results are as follows. First, school-related stress decreased subjective well-being, school trust, use of community institution, Second, the age and gender difference were verified in most pathways. Importantly, the mediating effects of school trust were significant regardless of gender and age group.

Conclusions:

This study confirmed the importance of school trust in reducing schol-related stress and improving subjective well-being of adolescents.

Moderating Effect of Resilience on the Relation between Interpersonal Stress and Binge Eating in Female College Students: An Exploratory Study
Seunghye Choi, Hoyoung Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(2):166-173.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.166
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Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effects of resilience on the relation between interpersonal stress and binge eating behavior in female college students.

Methods:

We investigated the relationships among interpersonal stress, resilience, and binge eating behavior of 213 female college students, and examined the moderating effects of resilience and its subcomponents (sense of control, sociality, and positivity) on the relationship between interpersonal stress and binge eating behavior through hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

Results:

Firstly, interpersonal stress indicated significant negative correlation with resilience and indicated significant positive correlation with binge eating behavior. Resilience and binge eating behavior indicated significant negative correlation. Secondly, resilience did not moderate the relation between interpersonal stress and binge eating behavior of female college students. However, the sense of control, an aspect of resilience, moderated the relationship between interpersonal stress and binge eating behavior of female college students.

Conclusions:

The results of this study suggest that higher interpersonal stress may increase the risk for binge eating behavior and that higher resilience may protect against binge eating behavior. The sense of control, an aspect of resilience, may enhance associations between interpersonal stress and binge eating behaviors in female college students.

The Effects of Anxious Attachment on Social Anxiety in College Students: Mediation Effects of Self-Esteem, Shame and Narcissistic Vulnerability
Yong Hee Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(2):174-182.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.174
  • 216 View
  • 8 Download
  • 2 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study aimed to examine the effect of anxious attachment on social anxiety in college students and to identify the mediation effects of self-esteem, shame and narcissistic vulnerability in using structural equation modeling.

Methods:

College students participated in this study.

Results:

First, all variables in this study had statistically significant correlation. Second, the relationship of anxious attachment and social anxiety was significantly mediated by self –esteem and shame, respectively. Finally, the two serial multiple mediation effects were also significant from anxious attachment to self-esteem, shame and narcissistic vulnerability or social anxiety successively.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that students’ unstable attachment can affect social anxiety or narcissistic vulnerability by mediating negative affect such as low self-esteem and shame. An intervention for students’ social anxiety is important in controlling their mental health.

The Effects of the Group Anger Regulation CBT on Sexual Cognitive Distortions and Rape Proclivity
Sewon Kim, Ji-Eun Gong, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2019;27(2):183-190.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.183
  • 130 View
  • 6 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of anger regulation cognitive behavior therapy on sexual cognitive distortions and rape proclivity on sexual offenders.

Methods:

The participants were sexual offenders who are currently imprisoned. The 37 participants were randomly assigned to either treatment group (n=18) or control group (n=19). The treatment group was administered 5 sessions (120-minute each). The program included how to recognize anger and practiced effective strategies to deal with it. All participants completed questionnaires at baseline and post-treatment.

Results:

No significant pre-post differences in anger, sexual cognitive distortions and rape proclivity were found between treatment group and control group.

Conclusions:

The findings suggest that anger regulation program is not enough to make significant differences in anger, sexual cognitive distortions and rape proclivity. However this study shows the potential possibilities of combination of anger regulation treatment and current CBT programs that would make current correcting programs for sex offenders more effective. Limitations and suggestions for further studies were proposed at the end.

The Effects of Neuroticism on Postpartum Depression: A Dual Mediating Effect of Gratitude and Parenting Stress
Yuji Lee, Myoung-Ho Hyun
STRESS. 2019;27(2):191-198.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.191
  • 164 View
  • 2 Download
  • 4 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of gratitude and parenting stress in the relationship between neuroticism and postpartum depression.

Methods:

155 respondents(mean age: 32.54 years) who were 4 weeks or more and 1 year or less postpartum completed surveys that measured levels of neuroticism, gratitude, parenting stress, and postpartum depression.

Results:

First, it shows that gratitude and parenting stress had partial mediating effect between neuroticism and postpartum depression each. Second, it was analyzed that gratitude and parenting stress had dual mediating effect between neuroticism and postpartum depression.

Conclusions:

Based on the results of this study, it was confirmed that neuroticism could inhibit the development of gratitude, and that leads to an increase in parenting stress, leading to postpartum depression. Also, current results suggest that gratitude intervention and dealing with parenting stress in the treatment and prevention of postpartum depression is important. This paper includes limitations, implications, and suggestions for the future study.

The Influence of Anxiety Sensitivity on Task Performance and Stress Response: The Moderating Effect of Depression
Sori Kim, Jung Hyun Lee
STRESS. 2019;27(2):199-204.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.199
  • 115 View
  • 4 Download
Abstract PDF
Backgoround:

This study aimed to examine the influence of anxiety sensitivity on task performance and physiological stress response, and to assess the effect of depression in this process for the youth population.

Methods:

We presented participants with an uncontrollable stress situation where they were required to perform mental arithmetic, based on the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). A total of 29 participants volunteered for this study. They completed the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 to measure their levels of anxiety sensitivity and depression. Two saliva samples, one before and one after the experiment, were collected to assess the change in cortisol levels as an index of physiological stress response.

Results:

Participants with high anxiety sensitivity showed lower performance on the mental arithmetic tasks and a significant increase in a salivary cortisol level, compared to those with low anxiety sensitivity. Furthermore, cortisol levels showed a remarkable increase where high anxiety sensitivity was coupled with depressed mood. In other hands, the levels of cortisol remained unchanged despite high anxiety sensitivity with low depressed mood.

Conclusions:

Our results confirm that the interaction between anxiety sensitivity and depression affects participants’ task performance and stress response, as measured through behavioral tasks and physiological data with self-report indices. Also, through the physiological data, we examined that those who have a high level of anxiety sensitivity showed maladaptive responses under high stressful situation.

Erratum
Correction to: The Effect of Life Changes on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder after Disasters
Hye Sun Lim, Kyungok Sim
STRESS. 2019;27(2):205-207.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.205
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