STRESS Indexed in /covered by CAS, KoreaScience & DOI/Crossref:eISSN 2234-1668   pISSN 1225-665X

STRESS : eISSN 2234-1668 / pISSN 1225-665X

Table. 3.

Table. 3.

Content and outcome of analysis of simulation program (N=8)

Author Session length/
time
Intervention
type
Content Outcome
measure
Findings
Ha, Jung [19] 1/120 min ∙Simulator
∙Standardized patient
∙ Respiratory disease pediatric care: assessment, vital sign check, suction, pulmonary therapy, and communication ∙ Nursing competence
∙ Perceived stress
∙ Self-efficacy
∙ Communication competence
∙ Significant difference in nursing competence
∙ No significant difference in perceived stress, self-efficacy, and communication skill
Hwang, Park [20] 2/Not mentioned ∙Standardized patient ∙ High risk pregnant women care
∙ Cesarean section care
∙ Preterm premature rupture of membrane
∙ Clinical judgment
∙ Nursing performance
∙ Communication ability
∙ Problem-solving ability
∙ Learning satisfaction
∙ Significant difference in clinical judgment nursing performance
∙ Significant difference in competency
∙ Significant difference in communication ability
∙ Significant difference in learning satisfaction
Lee, Kim, Kang, Kim [21] 1/120 min ∙Simulator ∙ Instructor-directed debriefing: the instructor asked each student directly
∙ Self-directed debriefing: students were asked to self-report their answers to the same question items
∙ Video-assisted, self-directed debriefing: students were recorded while self-reporting their responses after a video-assisted debriefing
∙ Academic self-efficacy
∙ Confidence in performance
∙ Communication competence
∙ Satisfaction with debriefing methods
∙ Video-assisted, self-directed debriefing group was more effective in improving confidence in performance, self-assessed communication skill, and satisfaction with debriefing methods
Son, Ki [22] 1/190 min ∙ Simulator ∙ Set the stage: student nurse’s introducing themselves, form rapport with the patient and the mother, describe the purpose of the visit, and ask open-ended questions to identify the patient’s overall condition
∙ Elicit information stage: introduced examples of listening and communication, elicit or specifically identify the patient’s nursing needs
∙ Give information stage: solve the nursing problem, explain expected result of intervention, provide accurate information
∙ Understand the patient’s perspective: non-verbal skills and verbal skills
∙ End the encounter stage: complete the therapeutic relationship at the end of nursing care and encourage to report new nursing-related problems
∙ Communication competency
∙ Communication efficacy
∙ Significant difference in communication competency
Kim, Heo [23] 1/75 min ∙ Simulator
∙ Standardized patient
∙ Educating caregivers ∙ Communication competence
∙ Problem-solving ability
∙ Self-leadership
∙ Significant difference in problem solving ability
∙ No significant difference in self-leadership and communication competence
Yang [24] 10/Not mentioned ∙ Simulator ∙ Presbycusis care: control environment, listen and speak with special care, medication, and education of self-care
∙ Cataract care: control environment, listen and speak with special care, medication, and education of self-care
∙ Communication competence
∙ Academic self-efficacy
∙ Attitude about the elderly
∙ Significant difference in communication competence
∙ Significant difference in attitude about the elderly
∙ No significant difference in academic self-efficacy
Hur, Song [25] 7/120 min ∙ Simulator ∙ Chest pain care
∙ Assess level of consciousness
∙ Assess respiration difficulties
∙ Clinical judgment
∙ Collaboration
∙ Communication skill
∙ Perceived education practices
∙ Significant difference in clinical judgment
∙ Significant difference in collaboration
∙ Significant difference in communication skill
∙ Significant difference in perceived education practices
∙ The impact of the perceived education practices and simulation design characteristics on facilitating the effectiveness of simulation education
Kim, Heo, Jeon, Jung [26] 1/85 min ∙ Simulator ∙ Elderly care
∙ Cognitive disorder care
∙ Communication competence
∙ Academic self-efficacy
∙ Attitude about the elderly
∙ Significant difference in communication competence
∙ No significant difference in academic self-efficacy and attitude about the elderly
Stress 2021;29:168-77 https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2021.29.3.168
© 2021 Stress