Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

STRESS : STRESS

Sumissioin : submit your manuscript
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse articles > Previous issues
5 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Volume 26(2); June 2018
Prev issue Next issue
Original Articles
Development of the Clinical Short-Form Positive Resources Test
Hyu Jung Huh, Sun-Young Kim, Jung-A Min, Jeong-Ho Chae
STRESS. 2018;26(2):77-87.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.2.77
  • 157 View
  • 1 Download
  • 4 Citations
Abstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background:

The present study aimed to develop a brief tool for assessing individual’s positive resource in clinical setting. The Positive Resources Test is a self-report questionnaire that measures 5 multi-dementional positive resources and comprises of 23 items, each rated on a 5-point scale.

Methods:

Literature searching and delphi survey were performed for making preliminary items, consulting and selecting final items. In order to test validity and reliability of the finally selected 23 items, data were collected from 546 adults. The measures included a variety of positive psychological scales.

Results:

The result of exploratory factor analysis of Positive Resources Test suggested 5 factor structures. The Positive Resources Test was shown to have acceptable psychometric porperties, including acceptable internal consistency reliabilities, factorial validity, and high convergent correlations.

Conclusions:

Although there is room for improvement for some facet scales, the Positive Resources Test appears to be useful tool for assessing individual’s positive resources.

Stress Relief and Related Factors in Camp Program for Firefighters
Jungha Shin, Minyoung Sim, Junghyun H. Lee, Da Young Lee, Kyoungsun Jeon, Seunga Oh, Jiae Kim, Okjoo Kim, Jungil Yang, Heebong Lee
STRESS. 2018;26(2):88-94.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.2.88
  • 173 View
  • 1 Download
  • 3 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study aims to test the effectiveness of a camp program and to analyze the factors related to stress relief. To this end, the present study conducted prospective research for six months on the change of stress, depression, and the level of post-traumatic stress among the firefighters who participated in the camp program.

Methods:

The perceived stress (PSS-K), stress by the different portion (GARS), post-traumatic stress symptoms (IES-R) and depression (BDI-II) were evaluated at five sessions over the span of six months, and the change of each measure was analyzed. Those five sessions were before the camp, right after the camp and a month, three months and six months after the camp. Moreover, this study assessed characteristics of sociodemographic, firefighting task and mental health that are related to the level of stress at six months after the camp.

Results:

Compared with before the camp, the level of depression was significantly lower right after the camp. However, the level did not have significant difference after a month period. At one month after the camp, the level of stress was significantly lower than before the camp, and was maintained after six months. The predictive factors of the degree of stress relief after the camp were high job stress and low disease stress.

Conclusions:

This study has found that the stress relief from the camp continued until six months after the camp, and the stress-relieving effect through the camp was substantial for those with higher job stress and lower disease stress.

The Effect of Hospice Service Experience on Life and Death Attitudes
Minhee Jang, Taeyun Jung
STRESS. 2018;26(2):95-102.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.2.95
  • 129 View
  • 2 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study was conducted to examine the impact of hospice service experiences on the volunteers’ attitudes toward life and death.

Methods:

Study 1 examined differences in life and death attitudes between hospice volunteers, hospice service trainees, and lay people using one-way ANOVA. Study 2 conducted in-depth interview with 10 hospice-patient care volunteers who had at least 3 years of experience.

Results:

After analyzing differences between three groups of lay people, hospice trainees and hospice volunteers, both hospice trainees and hospice volunteers compared to lay people showed lower pursuit of power and achievement, which can be interpreted as a characteristic of people motivated to volunteer, rather than volunteering itself. However, only hospice volunteers reported highly of religion and community as factors of meaningful life. Also, the volunteer group showed significantly lower death anxiety compare to the group without volunteer experience. Result of qualitative study showed that people realized the importance of family and altruistic lifestyle and prepared their own demise in their lives after volunteering.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that experiences of hospice service may be associated with self-transcendent life and positive death attitudes.

Development and Validation of the Korean Dysfunctional Depression Scale
Jong Nam Kim, Soonmook Lee, Seungwon Choi, Jungmin Chae, Dong Gi Seo, Heon Jeong Lee, Eun Soo Won
STRESS. 2018;26(2):103-114.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.2.103
  • 142 View
  • 4 Download
  • 2 Citations
Abstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background:

The purpose of this study is to develop and validate the Korean dysfunctional depression scale, which measures pathological depression including subclinical depression and clinical depression.

Methods:

To achieve this purpose, we collected data from patients diagnosed as having depressive disorder and clients with chief complaints related to depression, and 360 data were analyzed.

Results:

Using item linkage methods, we decided 20 items as a dysfunctional depression scale for group research. The results of reliability verification show high internal consistency and stable test-retest reliability. In addition, the result of factor validity demonstrates general factor and two specific factors-the first specific factor is ‘the physical-somatic factor’ and the second specific factor is ‘the pessimistic cognition and alienation factor’. Convergent validity was also confirmed good. Lastly, this study performed standard setting workshop consisting of content experts to decide cut-scores of dysfunctional depression scale. Through the workshop, the standard cut-score of normal-subclinical depression was decided as 44 and the standard cut-score of subclinical-clinical depression was decided as 58. The classification consistency and accuracy indices were to validate standard cut-scores.

Conclusions:

This Korean dysfunctional depression scale is verified to have high reliability and validity.

Influence of Religious & Existential Spirituality on Death Anxiety and Moderating Effect of Sex Differences
Heung Pyo Lee
STRESS. 2018;26(2):115-122.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.2.115
  • 118 View
  • 1 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

Purpose of this study was to investigate effect of religious & existential spirituality on death anxiety and difference of death anxiety according to sex and presence of spouse. Also we studied the moderating effect of sex in the process of religious & existential l spirituality affecting death anxiety.

Methods:

A total of 424 subjects were enrolled and the mean age was 38.14 years (SD=11.69).

Results:

First, Effect of religious & existential l spirituality on total score of death anxiety was not significant. But, there was differences in sub death anxiety. The higher religious spirituality, the lower fear of dying early and the higher existential spirituality, the lower fear of dying process and the higher fear of loss of important persons. Second, death anxiety of woman higher than man. Furtherrmore, death anxiety of woman with spouse higher then woman without spouse and man. Third, main effect of & existential spirituality and sex on fear of dying process and loss of important person was significant, Interaction effect of spirituality and sex was not significant. Also, main effect of & religious spirituality on fear of dying early was not significant and interaction effect of existential spirituality and sex was significant. There was no gender difference in the low existential spiritual group, but death anxiety of man was lower than woman in the high group.

Conclusions:

It is necessary to distinguish multiple aspects of death anxiety, to search and verify effects of spirituality on various death anxiety.


STRESS : STRESS