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Volume 26(1); March 2018
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Original Articles
The Effect of Emotional Labor, Social Support and Anger Expression on Nurses’ Organizational Commitment
Ji Eun Kim, Sung Hee Shin, Suk Jeong Ko
STRESS. 2018;26(1):1-6.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.1
  • 1,775 View
  • 74 Download
  • 12 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study was conducted to identify the effects of emotional labor, social support, anger expression on nurses’ organizational commitment.

Methods:

The participants were 175 nurses working at one university hospital. Data were collected from January 26th to February 2nd in 2015 and were analyzed with Multiple Regression Analysis.

Results:

The most influential factor on nurse’s organizational commitment was supervisor’s support (β= .40) followed by emotional labor (β=−.24) and peer’s support (β=.15), which together explained their organizational commitment up to 35.0% (F=16.36, p<.001).

Conclusions:

Through this study result, the factors influencing nurse’s organizational commitment were supervisor’s support, emotional labor, and peer support, among which supervisor’s support was the most influential factor. The results of the study improve nurse’s organizational commitment, supervisor’s support is needed for nurses to understand and solve problems that they encounter.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Experience of violence, social support, nursing practice environment, and burnout on mental health among mental health nurses in South Korea: A structural equation modeling analysis
    Jung Suk Park, Hee Kyung Kim, Mihyoung Lee
    Applied Nursing Research.2024; 78: 151819.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Clinical Nurses’ Job Crafting on Organizational Effectiveness Based on Job Demands-Resource Model
    Eun Young Lee, Eungyung Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2023; 53(1): 129.     CrossRef
  • A structural model of nursing students’ performing communication skills
    Cho Rong Gil, Kyung Mi Sung
    The Journal of Korean Academic Society of Nursing Education.2023; 29(2): 148.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Clinical Practice Stress and Anger Expression on Assertive Behavior in Nursing Students
    Eun-Ju LEE, Gyu-Li BAEK
    JOURNAL OF FISHRIES AND MARINE SCIENCES EDUCATION.2022; 34(1): 104.     CrossRef
  • The life history narrative of clinical nurses with more than 30 years of experience
    Bong Ja Shin, Eun Young Park
    BMC Nursing.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Work Performance, Anger Management Ability, Resiliece, and Self Compassion of Clinical Nurses
    Young Ae Kim, Kuem Sun Han
    Journal of Korean Academy of psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.2021; 30(2): 110.     CrossRef
  • Influences of Workplace Violence on Depression among Nurses: The Mediating Effect of Social Support
    Eun-Mi Seol, Soohyun Nam
    STRESS.2021; 29(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Organizational Commitment of Nurses in Korean Red Cross Blood Center: Focusing on Positive Psychological Capital, Communication Ability, and Social Support
    Sun Young Park, Jae Soon Yoo
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(2): 179.     CrossRef
  • Emotional Labor and its Related Factors in Nurses in the Outpatient Department
    Eun-Jeong Ma, Kuemsun Han
    Stress.2020; 28(3): 160.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Positive Psychological Capital, Social Support and Head Nurses' Authentic Leadership on Organizational Commitment of Nurses at the Advanced Beginner Stage
    Hye Sook Kwon, Yeongmi Ha
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2020; 26(3): 284.     CrossRef
  • The Moderating Effect of Supervisor's Support in Relation to Violence Experience between Co-workers and Organizational Commitment of Nurses Working in Special Departments of a Hospital
    Kyung Min Kim, Eun Nam Lee, Moon Ja Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2020; 26(4): 400.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Emotional Labor, Job Stress and Social Support on Nurses’ Job Satisfaction
    Seung Young Lee, Duck Ho Kim
    Stress.2019; 27(3): 215.     CrossRef
The Validation Study of the Hypomanic Personality Scale for Use in Korea
Jinkyung Oh, Heyeon Park, Chad Ebesutani, Sungwon Choi
STRESS. 2018;26(1):7-17.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.7
  • 2,142 View
  • 53 Download
Abstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background:

Hypomanic Personality Scale (HPS) had been adapted into several languages for use in various countries as a tool to measure hypomanic tendencies. It is widely used to investigate bipolar disorder risk among non-clinical samples. Its usefulness has also been suggested in Korea via recent studies.

Methods:

The HPS was adapted through a back-translation process by two bilinguist and reviewed by three clinical psychologists. To investigate internal consistency, test-retest, and convergent and concurrent validity of the HPS, 230 normal participants completed a self-report battery on-line. Explanatory factor analysis was performed to examine the factor structure of the HPS.

Results:

The adapted HPS showed good internal consistency and test-retest correlations. Validation results showed that people who had higher HPS total scores had more extraversion in social relations and openness to new environments and experiences. The HPS scores also had positive correlations with scores of borderline personality trait, impulsive tendencies, sensation seeking, and grandiosity. People with a stronger hypomanic tendency had more hypomania symptoms and depressive symptoms. Exploratory factor analysis supported two factors: (1) ‘social vitality and self-confidence,’ associated with positive characteristics, and (2) ‘hypomanic-like symptoms,’ associated with negative attributes.

Conclusions:

The adapted HPS scores were reliable and valid for measuring hypomanic personalities. Hypomanic personality might have two aspects, one related to usefulness for daily life functioning, and the other vulnerable to psychological problems. The implications and limitations of this research and subsequent studies are discussed.

A Study on the Influencing Factors on the Preparation for Retirement and Retirement Stress of the Nurses
Kyung Hee Kim, Joo Hyun Kim, Dong Sook Lee, Sung Ja Yoon, Kyoung Shil Jang, Sun Ki Lee
STRESS. 2018;26(1):18-24.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.18
  • 1,915 View
  • 32 Download
  • 2 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to identify the influencing factors on the preparation for retirement of the nurses.

Methods:

Participants were total 165 clinical nurses and data were collected using questionnaires and analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, Kruskal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test, Pearson correlation and multiple regression with SPSS 23.0.

Results:

There was significant negative correlation between retirement stress and preparation for retirement. Marital status and intention to reemployment were accounted for 12.1% of variance in preparation for retirement. Attitude for retirement was accounted for 16.4% of variance in retirement stress.

Conclusions:

The result of this study suggested that it is important to manage attitude for retirement and preparation for retirement in order to reduce retirement stress in clinical nurses. And we need to develop education program for retirement in order to opportunity to prepare retirement of clinical nurses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of Retirement Expectation and Retirement Readiness on Retirement Anxiety among Middle-aged Nurses
    Eun-Young Kim, Se-Young Jung
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2023; 29(2): 130.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Retirement and Old-Age Preparedness of Optometrists
    Ok-Jin Lee
    Journal of Korean Ophthalmic Optics Society.2018; 23(4): 309.     CrossRef
Influences of Cognitive Emotion Regulation and Social Support on Social Anxiety amongNursing Students
Ok-Hee Cho, Young-Hee Kim
STRESS. 2018;26(1):25-31.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.25
  • 1,089 View
  • 22 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study was a descriptive research study conducted to investigate the influences of cognitive emotion regulation and social support on social anxiety among nursing students.

Methods:

The participants were 672 nursing department students at a university. The participants were surveyed using structured questionnaires for cognitive emotion regulation, social support, and social anxiety from March to May 2017.

Results:

The results showed that the absence of social conflict, rumination of cognitive emotion regulation, and social support were found to affect social anxiety; these variables predicted the social anxiety of nursing students by 27%. The social anxiety of nursing students also varied according to religion, satisfaction with their nursing major, and academic achievement. There was a positive correlation between cognitive emotion regulation and social anxiety, but a negative correlation between social support and social anxiety.

Conclusions:

This study was significant in demonstrating that cognitive emotion regulation and social support of nursing students are verified factors affecting social anxiety. It is necessary to consider cognitive emotion regulation and social support when developing an intervention program to reduce social anxiety in nursing students.

The Relationship between Post-Traumatic Growth, Trauma Experience and Cognitive Emotion Regulation in Nurses
Sook Lee, Mun Gyeong Gwon, YeonJung Kim
STRESS. 2018;26(1):31-37.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.31
  • 2,558 View
  • 122 Download
  • 8 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purposes of this study were to identify the relationships among post-traumatic growth, trauma experience, cognitive emotion regulation (adoptive and maladoptive) and to determine the influences on post-traumatic growth in nurses.

Methods:

The participants were 105 nurses in Chung-Nam and Gyeonggi-do. Some variables related to post-traumatic growth, trauma experience, cognitive emotion regulation were measured using reliable instruments.

Results:

There showed significant positive relationships of post-traumatic growth with adoptive cognitive emotion regulation. Among predictors, adoptive cognitive emotion regulation, career and position had statistically significant influence on post-traumatic growth.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that intervention on post-traumatic growth that targets the adoptive cognitive emotion regulation may be helpful in enhancing post-traumatic growth in nurses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Latent Patterns of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms, Depression, and Posttraumatic Growth Among Adolescents During the COVID‐19 Pandemic
    Rui Zhen, Xiao Zhou
    Journal of Traumatic Stress.2022; 35(1): 197.     CrossRef
  • Post-Traumatic Growth of Nurses in COVID-19 Designated Hospitals in Korea
    Suk-Jung Han, Ji-Young Chun, Hye-Jin Bae
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 20(1): 56.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Post-traumatic Growth of Nurses at Nationally Designated Infectious Disease Hospital
    Ji Eun Oh, Ju Young Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2022; 28(5): 499.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of posttraumatic growth of intensive care unit nurses in Korea
    Ae Kyung Chang, Hyejin Yoon, Ji Hyun Jang
    Japan Journal of Nursing Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Caregivers' psychological suffering and posttraumatic growth after patient death
    Eunmi Lee, Yujeong Kim
    Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.2021; 57(3): 1323.     CrossRef
  • Nursing Heroes Under Social Pressure: An Review of the Refusal to Care
    Jeong Yun PARK
    Korean Journal of Medical Ethics.2021; 24(1): 89.     CrossRef
  • The Structural Analysis of Variables Related to Posttraumatic Growth among Psychiatric Nurses
    Hyun Ju Yeo, Hyun Suk Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2020; 50(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • Traumatic Events and Factors Affecting Post-traumatic Growth of Nurses in General Hospitals
    Haesook Kim, Eunsook Kim, Younghee Yu
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2020; 26(3): 218.     CrossRef
The Study of Preceptor Nurses’ Occupational Stress and Burden
Joohee Han, Eun Kwang Yoo
STRESS. 2018;26(1):38-45.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.38
  • 3,172 View
  • 252 Download
  • 18 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study is a descriptive survey research that aims to investigate occupational stress and burden in preceptor nurses.

Methods:

A total of 173 preceptors have more than 3 years experiences were recruited from 2 university hospital in S-city and I-city.

Results:

The job demand of occupational stress in preceptor nurses was higher than top 25% of Korean workers. To investigate the level of job demand, preceptor’s burden examined, the preceptor’s burden related to new nurses was higher than other reasons. Variables influencing preceptor’s burden were; work department, education period per new nurse and education level of preceptor.

Conclusions:

We suggest repeated research of preceptor nurse’s occupational stress and burden with more variables and it is necessary policy support for nurse’s work environment and improved treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Influences of Organizational Culture, Nursing Workplace Spirituality, and Nurses’ Perceived Health Status on Quality of Nursing Work Life according to Nursing Clinical Ladder
    Hyun Sook Lee, Ju Hyun Jin, Ju Ri Lee, Hye Jin Kim, Yeon Jae Jung
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2024; 30(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Sleep quality according to chronotype in nurses working 8-hour shifts
    H Yang, S Kim, S-H Yoo, Y Mun, M L Choi, J A Lee, E Song
    Occupational Medicine.2024; 74(4): 290.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Roles and Outcomes of Nurse Educators in Hospitals: A Scoping Review
    Soyoung Kim, Sujin Shin, Inyoung Lee
    Korean Medical Education Review.2023; 25(1): 55.     CrossRef
  • Content Analysis of Feedback Journals for New Nurses From Preceptor Nurses Using Text Network Analysis
    Shin Hye Ahn, Hye Won Jeong
    CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing.2023; 41(10): 780.     CrossRef
  • Burnout among Nurses in COVID-19 Designated Units Compared with Those in General Units Caring for Both COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 Patients
    Kyung Ah Woo, Eun Kyoung Yun, JiSun Choi, Hye Min Byun
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2023; 29(4): 374.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Job Stress, Social Support, and Infection Control Fatigue on Professional Quality of Life among Nurses in Designated COVID-19 Hospitals
    Minyoung Shin, Woojoung Joung
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2023; 29(5): 603.     CrossRef
  • The Cycle of Verbal Violence Among Nurse Colleagues in South Korea
    Su-Hyun Park, Eun-Hi Choi
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence.2022; 37(5-6): NP3107.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Occupational Health of Shift Nurses: Focusing on Job Stress, Health Promotion Behavior, Resilience, and Sleep Disturbance
    Da-Som Choi, Sang-Hee Kim
    Safety and Health at Work.2022; 13(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • The Factors That Affect Turnover Intention According to Clinical Experience: A Focus on Organizational Justice and Nursing Core Competency
    Hanna Choi, Sujin Shin
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(6): 3515.     CrossRef
  • An online communication skills training program for nursing students: A quasi-experimental study
    Jeongwoon Yang, Sungjae Kim, Sergio A. Useche
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(5): e0268016.     CrossRef
  • A structural equation model of the relationship among occupational stress, coping styles, and mental health of pediatric nurses in China: a cross-sectional study
    Yating Zhou, Xiaoli Guo, Huaying Yin
    BMC Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and Preliminary Evaluation of the Effects of a Preceptor Reflective Practice Program: A Mixed-Method Research
    Heui-Seon Kim, Hye-Won Jeong, Deok Ju, Jung-A Lee, Shin-Hye Ahn
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(21): 13755.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Nurses’ Preceptorship Experience in Educating New Graduate Nurses and Preceptor Training Courses on Clinical Teaching Behavior
    Kyung Jin Hong, Hyo-Jeong Yoon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(3): 975.     CrossRef
  • Types of Role Perception of Preceptors for New Nurses: A Q Methodology Approach
    Sukyung Kim, Byoungsook Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2021; 27(3): 204.     CrossRef
  • Development and Evaluation of a Preceptor Education Program Based on the One-Minute Preceptor Model: Participatory Action Research
    Hye Won Jeong, Deok Ju, Myoung Lee Choi, Suhyun Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(21): 11376.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Parenting Stress and Co-worker Support on Work-Life Balance in Nurses Reinstated after Parental Leave
    Yi-Rang Jeong, Taewha Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing Administration.2020; 26(4): 331.     CrossRef
  • Education Programs for Newly Graduated Nurses in Hospitals: A Scoping Review
    Mijung Kim, Sujin Shin, Inyoung Lee
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(5): 440.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Self-efficacy, Critical Thinking Disposition, Self-leadership, and Communication Competency on the Core Competencies of the Preceptor in Advanced General Hospitals
    Yun Mi Kang, Young Eun
    Journal of Korean Academic Society of Nursing Education.2018; 24(3): 279.     CrossRef
Mediating Effect of Stress Coping in the Relationship between Technostress and Teacher Efficacy of Early Childhood Teachers
Ji Young Lee
STRESS. 2018;26(1):46-51.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.46
  • 1,710 View
  • 45 Download
  • 6 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between early childhood teachers’ technostress and teacher efficacy, and explored the mediation effects of stress coping in the between technostress and teacher efficacy.

Methods:

The subjects of the study were 197 kindergarten and child care center teachers who work in Seoul and Gyeonggi do. The data were collected from 5, November 2017 to 20, November. It was analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and multiple regression using SPSS 20.0 program.

Results:

Participants was a moderate degree of technostress and stress coping, and slightly higher degree of teacher efficacy. There were significant correlations among technostress, stress coping and teacher efficacy. Technostress was positively correlated with stress coping and was negatively correlated with teacher efficacy. Stress coping was acted as a mediator in the between technostress and teacher efficacy.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that it is necessary to develop and apply an intervention program focusing on stress coping in order to lower the technostress and raise the teacher efficacy of early childhood teachers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Relationship between Self-Esteem and Technological Readiness: Mediation Effect of Readiness for Change and Moderated Mediation Effect of Gender in South Korean Teachers
    Jungsug Kim, Eunjeung Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(14): 8463.     CrossRef
  • Öğretmen Adaylarının Teknostres Düzeylerinin Belirlenmesi
    Mahmut ÇALIŞKAN, Ahmet Naci ÇOKLAR
    Anadolu Üniversitesi Eğitim Fakültesi Dergisi.2022; 6(3): 341.     CrossRef
  • Parental Involvement in Distance K-12 Learning and the Effect of Technostress: Sustaining Post-Pandemic Distance Education in Saudi Arabia
    Ahlam Mohammed Al-Abdullatif, Hibah Khalid Aladsani
    Sustainability.2022; 14(18): 11305.     CrossRef
  • Consequences of COVID-19 Confinement for Teachers: Family-Work Interactions, Technostress, and Perceived Organizational Support
    Patricia Solís García, Rocío Lago Urbano, Sara Real Castelao
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(21): 11259.     CrossRef
  • DETERMINATION OF TECHNOLOGY ATTITUDES AND TECHNOSTRESS LEVELS OF GEOGRAPHY TEACHER CANDIDATES
    Ahmet Naci ÇOKLAR, Recep BOZYİĞİT
    lnternational Journal of Geography and Geography Education.2021; (44): 102.     CrossRef
  • The Moderating Effects of Ego-Resilience and Relationship with Colleague Teachers on the Association between the Effects of Technostress and Teaching Efficacy of Early Childhood Teachers
    Jiyoung Lee, Sungwon Kim
    Stress.2019; 27(3): 251.     CrossRef
The Effect of Stress Vulnerability on Stress Level
Gyoungmook Park, Eunyoung Park
STRESS. 2018;26(1):52-59.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.52
  • 2,012 View
  • 110 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study was aimed to test the power of explanation of stress vulnerability for stress level, which is the subscales of IESS.

Methods:

237 University students (3∼4 grade) and late 20∼early 40’s administered IESS twice and these data were analyzed.

Results:

Correlation between all scales of stress vulnerability and stress level were positively significant (r=0.18∼0.47). Results of multiple regression analysis suggested that regardless of test time, perfectionism and avoidance scale of stress vulnerability had the biggest explanation power for stress level and stress vulnerability could explain the future stress level significantly.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that IESS which is consisted with stress vulnerability and stress level might be utilized to predict future stress.

Effects of Emotional Development Therapy (EDT) on Stress, Fatigue, Sleep, and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in Nurses
Mi-Young Jeong, Nam-Sook Seo
STRESS. 2018;26(1):60-67.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.60
  • 1,612 View
  • 56 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

The aim of this study is to verify the effects of EDT on stress, fatigue, sleep and HRV in nurses. The study was a quasi-experiment using nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design.

Methods:

Experimental treatment was to contact EDT 3 points on the body surface. EDT touch used the first fingerprint of the thumb for 3 minutes on the frontal branch of superficial temporal area, 3 minutes on the facial area, and 4 minutes on the axillary area. EDT was applied 10 minutes, twice a week for 5 weeks.

Results:

Data were analyzed with SPSS 23.0 program. As a result, stress, fatigue, sleep, and HRV were statistically significant difference in both groups.

Conclusions:

EDT can be used not only for nurses’ health maintenance and promotion but also for independent nursing intervention at clinical practice.

Pathways to Collective Emotions: Proximity, Media Exposure, Initial Reactions and Appraisal following the Sewol Ferry Disaster
Young Ae Kim, Bu Jong Kim, Yun Kyeung Choi
STRESS. 2018;26(1):68-75.   Published online March 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.1.68
  • 1,212 View
  • 27 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of the present study was to explore the impacts of proximity, media exposure, initial reactions and appraisal on ‘sorry feeling’ as trauma-related collective emotions.

Methods:

The data were collected from a sample of 2,009 respondents (552 males and 1,457 females) using an online survey during a week at a year after Sewol ferry disaster. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to specify from proximity and media exposure to collective emotions through initial reactions at peri-disaster period (T1) and appraisals at the 1st anniversary of the disaster (T2).

Results:

The results showed that the proximity, amounts of media exposure (T1 and T2) and initial reactions (T1) influenced collective emotions through the appraisals at T2.

Conclusions:

These results were discussed in terms of moral injury and collective emotions. Limitation of this study and directions of future research were suggested.


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