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Volume 24(2); June 2016
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Original Articles
The Moderating Effects of the Way of Coping in between Perceived Stress and Smartphone Use in Adolescent
Dong Hee Kim
Korean J Str Res. 2016;24(2):57-64.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2016.24.2.57
  • 1,093 View
  • 30 Download
  • 3 Citations
Abstract PDF
The objective of this study was to identify the moderating effects of the way adolescents cope when under perceived stress and smartphone usage. Data were collected from 102 middle school students using a self-reported questionnaire, which included a general stress scale, the way of coping checklist, and smartphone usage time per day. A Descriptive, Pearson correlation and hierarchial regression analyses were performed and found that 80% of the student participants used samrtphone. The average smartphone usage per day was 2.8 hours. Smartphone usage time correlated with perceived stress (r=0.344, p=<.01), emotion focused coping (r=0.438, p=<.01), and wishful thinking coping (r=0.285, p=<.01). The emotion focused coping had a moderating effect (<i>β</i>=1.105, p=<.05) between perceived stress and smartphone usage in adolescents. In conclusion, intervention included a proper and active way of coping with stressful situations that could be used to help control smartphone usage in adolescents. (Korean J Stress Res 2016;24:57∼64)

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exploring Stress and Problematic Use of Short-Form Video Applications among Middle-Aged Chinese Adults: The Mediating Roles of Duration of Use and Flow Experience
    Qing Huang, Mingxin Hu, Hongliang Chen
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 19(1): 132.     CrossRef
  • The Mediating Effects of Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance on the Relationship between Stress and Internet/Smartphone Addiction in Adolescents
    Hyejeen Lee
    Korean Journal of Stress Research.2017; 25(4): 279.     CrossRef
  • Influence of University Students' Stress on Drinking Problem: Mediating Effect of Alcohol Expectancy and Moderating Effect of Stress Coping
    Eunyoung Park
    Korean Journal of Stress Research.2017; 25(4): 265.     CrossRef
The Moderating Effect of Self-Compassion in the Relationship between Self-Focused Attention and Social Anxiety
Eun Soo Shim, Bong-Keon Lee
Korean J Str Res. 2016;24(2):65-74.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2016.24.2.65
  • 936 View
  • 19 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
The purpose of the study was to test moderating role of self compassion in the relationship between self-focused attention and social anxiety. Scale for Dispositional Self-focused Attention in Social situation, Self-Compassion Scale, and Social Avoidance and Distress Scale were administered to a sample of 425 undergraduate students. The result was as follows: First, Correlation analysis was conducted to examine the relation among self-focused attention, self-compassion, social anxiety. Self-focused attention was positive significantly correlated social anxiety. In contrast, self-compassion was negative significantly correlated social anxiety. Second, self-compassion interacted with self-focused attention such that it played a more prominent role in protecting against social anxiety symptoms during lower self-focused attention than during higher self-focused attention. This result suggested the importance of self-focused attention and self-compassion in psychological approach to university students who have difficulty in social anxiety. (Korean J Stress Res 2016;24:65∼74)

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Influence of Traumatic Experience and Post-Event Rumination on Social Anxiety: The Mediating Effects of Self-Compassion
    Suyeon Lee, Kyung Park
    Stress.2019; 27(1): 74.     CrossRef
The Effects of Essential Oil Inhalation on the Stress and Sympathetic Nerve Activity
Ik Lyul Bae, Myung Haeng Hur
Korean J Str Res. 2016;24(2):75-83.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2016.24.2.75
  • 973 View
  • 46 Download
  • 6 Citations
Abstract PDF
This study utilized a nonequivalent control group pretest posttest design in order to compare the effects of essential oil (EO) on Stress and sympathetic nerve activity after an exposure to stressors. The adults without any diagnosed disease are volunteered and enrolled through a recruitment advertisement to December of 2013 as the subjects of this study. The data were collected by convenient sampling of experimental group of 17 and control group of 15 were finally selected to meet the requirements to be this research subjects. The collection of the data for this research was approved by Institutional Review Board (IRB) beforehand. Stressor was university final exams. Stress Index was significantly lower in the EO inhalation group than control group. However, it did not show significant differences in sympathetic nerve activity. The inhalation of aromatherapy essential oil was effective on reducing of the stress. (Korean J Stress Res 2016;24:75∼83)

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effects of Short-term Urban Forest Experiences by Season on Stress and Affective Response of University Students
    Eunjin Kim, Hwayong Lee
    Journal of People, Plants, and Environment.2023; 26(4): 433.     CrossRef
  • The Comparative Effects of Aroma Essential Oil Inhalation and Music Listening on Stress Response, Vital Signs, and Bispectral Index of Healthy Adults
    Jae-Kyeum Lee, Myung-Haeng Hur
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2022; 34(1): 62.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Gymnastics-based Nursing Intervention on Stress, Obesity, and Mental Health Confidence in Patients with Chronic Mental Illness
    Hee Jeong Kim, Sookbin Im
    Journal of Korean Academy of psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.2021; 30(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Effects of the Essential Oils of Sweet Orange, Lavender and Amyris on EEG Activity
    Yerin Je, Sungkwan An, Hyangseon Ro, Jawun Cho, Seunghee Bae
    Asian Journal of Beauty and Cosmetology.2021; 19(4): 651.     CrossRef
  • Effects of aromatherapy on stress, fructosamine, fatigue, and sleep quality in prediabetic middle-aged women: A randomised controlled trial
    Myung-Haeng Hur, Jun Hwa Hong, SeongHee Yeo
    European Journal of Integrative Medicine.2019; 31: 100978.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Aromatherapy on Stress Responses, Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Blood Pressure in the Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography: A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial
    Eun Jeong Song, Mi Young Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2018; 48(1): 1.     CrossRef
The Relationship between Military Life Stress and Military Life Adaptation of Privates: The Mediating Effect of Military Official and Comrade Support
Hyun Jun Won, Myoung-Ho Hyun
Korean J Str Res. 2016;24(2):85-94.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2016.24.2.85
  • 632 View
  • 10 Download
Abstract PDF
This study was aimed to examine the mediating effect of military official support and comrade support on the relationship between military life stress and military life adaptation. A sample of 300 privates was surveyed. Questionnaires including Military Life Stress, Military Life Adaptation, and Social Support (military official support and comrade support). Correlation analysis and hierarchical regression analysis were used for data analysis. The results showed that military life stress was negatively related to military official support, comrade support and military life adaptation. Military official and comrade support was positively associated with military life adaptation. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that military official support partially mediated the relationship between military life stress and adaptation. Also, comrade support partially mediated the relationship between military life stress and adaptation. These results suggest that support can be effective variable in improving military life stress among privates with military life stress. Finally, the limitations of this study were discussed along with suggestions for further research. (Korean J Stress Res 2016;24:85∼94)
The Association between Occupational Stress and Health Behaviors in a Hospital Employee
Dong Jun Kim, Eon Sook Lee, Yun-Jun Yang, Yeong Sook Yoon, Jun-Hyung Lee, Dai Jung Yeo, Jung Il Kim, Seong Eun Kim, Eun Gyoung Song, Ji Yeon Lee
Korean J Str Res. 2016;24(2):95-102.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2016.24.2.95
  • 879 View
  • 11 Download
  • 5 Citations
Abstract PDF
Purpose of this study is to evaluate association of job characteristics or occupational stress with health behavior in hospital employees. Total 687 employees were recruited from a university hospital in Korea and completed a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire includes demographic factors (age, marriage) and job characteristics such as job type, job position, shift work, type of employment. Perceived stress and occupational stress assessed by Korean Occupational Stress Scale were also measured. Outcome variables was bad health behavior such as current smoking, problem drinking, no exercise and insufficient sleep. Multivariate analyses were conducted separately in male and female because of different health behaviors by sex. In male, there was association between insufficient sleep and occupational stress, total score and subscales like job demand, organizational system, and occupational climate. In female, it was observed an association between insufficient sleep and job demand. Irregular exercise was associated with insufficient job control, job insecurity in female. Problem drinking was associated with shift worker. Insufficient sleep was related with stress perception. In conclusion, there are an association between occupational stress and health behavior in hospital employees. (Korean J Stress Res 2016;24:95∼102)

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The association between occupational stress level and health-related productivity loss among Korean employees
    Jonghee Chung, Jin-Hyo Kim, Jae Yoon Lee, Hee Seok Kang, Dong-wook Lee, Yun-Chul Hong, Mo-Yeol Kang
    Epidemiology and Health.2022; 45: e2023009.     CrossRef
  • Job Stress and Cardiometabolic Lifestyle Modification Behaviors Among Workers in High-risk and Low-risk Workplaces
    Jiyeon Jung, Jina Choo, Sooyeon Park, Jihyun Moon, Songwhi Noh
    Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.2021; 63(6): e346.     CrossRef
  • A Study on Influence Factors of the Job Stress on Job Satisfaction and Job Performance
    Hye Kyung Kim, Sung-Soo Kim
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2019; 44(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Mindful Self-Compassion: How it Can Enhance Resilience
    Shattell Mona, Johnson Angela
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services.2018; 56(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Taxpayer’s Perception to Tax Payment in Kind System in Support of SMEs’ Sustainability: Case of the South Korean Government’s Valuation of Unlisted Stocks
    KapSoon Kim, SungMan Yoon
    Sustainability.2017; 9(9): 1523.     CrossRef

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