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Volume 23(3); September 2015
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Original Articles
Stress Coping and Emotional Regulation Mediate between Character Strengths and Adjustment
JeongWon Shin, HyoJoung Jang, MyoungHo Hyun
Korean J Str Res. 2015;23(3):109-118.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2015.23.3.109
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  • 4 Citations
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The purposes of this study was to investigate how individuals’ stress-coping strategies and emotion-regulation abilities mediate the relationship between character strengths and adjustment to college life. The character strength of interest was the virtue of temperance, which in this study was operationalized to include two constructs: self-regulation and prudence. A sample of 642 college students completed the Character Strength Test, Student Adjustment to College Questionnaire, Ways of Coping Checklist, and Emotion Regulation Checklist. We conducted multiple regression analyses on measures of self-regulation and prudence as independent variables, stress-coping strategies and emotional regulation as the mediation variables, and adjustment to college life as the dependent variable, examining whether stepwise regression models accounted for more variance than did linear ones. Our results suggest that emotional regulation and stress-coping strategies partially mediate the relationship between self-regulation and adjustment to college life. They also partially mediate the relationship between prudence and adjustment to college life. Despite these findings, our study is not without limitations. We discuss these in detail and provide directions for future research. (Korean J Str Res 2015;23:109∼118)
Influencing Factors to the Subjective Well-being of the College Students
Won Guen Im
Korean J Str Res. 2015;23(3):119-126.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2015.23.3.119
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  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
This study was conducted to find out the factors of psychological traits and life experience that affect the subjective well-being of the college students.The study was based on the survey of 279 college students who study in Kyunggi-do and Seoul. The survey result shows that the subjective well-being of the college students is not statistically related to the general factors. However, the multiple regression analysis considering psychological traits and life experience shows that Satisfaction with their Majors, Social support, Job-seeking stress, Optimism and Self-efficacy in order of importance affect the subjective well-being of the college students and thus life experience is more important factor than psychological traits. The study suggests that the environment building to provide positive experiences in daily lives to the students for their subjective well-being increase is important and also the social welfare service for the students’ positive thinking is needed. (Korean J Str Res 2015;23:119∼126)
Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Somatic Symptoms, Somato-Sensory Amplification, Self-Absorption, and Experiential Avoidance of University Students with Somatic Symptoms
Mina Hong, ChongNak Son
Korean J Str Res. 2015;23(3):127-135.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2015.23.3.127
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The purpose of this study is to explore effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) on Somatic Symptoms, Somato-Sensory Amplification, Self-Absorption, and Experiential Avoidance of University Students with Somatic Symptoms. 400 university students who lived in Chonbuk province were investigated that they were complained somatic symptoms. Finally 15 students who selected were randomly assigned to 8 in ACT group (therapy group), and 7 in the control group. All participants completed <i>Somatic Symptom Scale</i>, <i>Somato-Sensory Amplification</i> <i>Scale</i>, <i>Scale for Dispositional Self-focused Attention</i>, <i>Acceptance & Action Questionnaire-16 </i>at pre treatment, end of treatment, and at 5 weeks follow-up periods. ACT program was administered for 8 sessions. The results of this study were as follow: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has positive effects on the reduction of Somatic Symptoms, Self-Absorption, and Experiential Avoidance after therapy 5 weeks later follow-up period, while has not on Somato-Sensory Amplification. Finally, the implication and the limitation of this study, and the suggestions for the future study were also discussed. (Korean J Str Res 2015;23:127∼135)
Drinking Problem and Mental Health among Female College Students
Seunghee Yang, Ji-Won Yoon
Korean J Str Res. 2015;23(3):137-145.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2015.23.3.137
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  • 3 Citations
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The purpose of this study was to identify the drinking problem and mental health status and to analyze the correlations between drinking problem and mental health status among female college students. The participants were 536 female college students in 3 different cities and data were collected using self-reporting questionnaires. The data were analyzed by the SPSS 18.0 version. The average score for AUDIT-K was 6.54 and 65.9% of the subjects were in the low risk drinking, 25.7% in the high risk drinking, and each 4.2% were in a harmful and hazardous use. Sophomore scored the highest AUDIT-K and mental health status was significantly different according to the physical health status, major and college life satisfaction. Drinking problem was significantly correlated to the mental health status and mental health status was significantly different according to the level of drinking problem. The findings of this study provide guidance for developing strategies, such as mind control program to prevent problematic drinking in female college students. (Korean J Str Res 2015;23:137∼145)
Role Conflict and Conflict Management Styles of Hospital Nurses
Younebook Lee, Hyeakyung Lee
Korean J Str Res. 2015;23(3):147-158.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2015.23.3.147
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  • 13 Citations
Abstract PDF
This study is narrative research attempted to provide basic data to present a direction for improving the work environment and for adjusting the role conflict of hospital nurses by revealing the degree of the role conflict occurring in various areas when performing their roles and by investigating which types they manage the conflict during their role conflict situations. The research subjects are 213 nurses working in C University Hospital in C City who have more than one year of experience. The study results are as follows: The total average of hospital nurses' role conflict showed a slightly higher score than the median with 1.91 points (range 0∼3 points). Of the degree of role conflict that hospital nurses experience, the score was the highest of the role conflict between patients/caregivers relationship (2.15 points). Regarding the conflict management types, the score of mixed type was the highest. The study also revealed that relatively positive conflict management methods such as combination and compromise types are used. It seems that the nurses need to find more fundamental conflict resolution methods through active conflict management methods. (Korean J Str Res 2015;23:147∼158)

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