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Volume 12(3); September 2004
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Original Articles
Stress and Self-management
So-Woo Lee
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):1-12.   Published online November 21, 2004
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Abstract PDF
he use of self-management training as a mode of stress management is increasing in the movement of the current participative response of the consumers of health and health care providers such as physiciens or nurses. Self-management training offers guidence to change physiological processes, cognitions, behavioral habits and emotions by self-regulation. In self management training, the patient-professional relationship places the responsibility on the patient for setting goals, monitoring health and illness signs, and evaluating the success of the change program. Evaluation of this mode of stress management care focuses on self-evaluation to reduction of stress responses and continuous of training. There are several different type of relaxation methods to relieve stress responses.
Repression and Management of Anger
Yong-Hee Kim
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):13-16.   Published online November 21, 2004
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Abstract PDF
In clinical situation, many patients reported stressful events in home and work place. Instead they work it out proper way, repression of anger is one of the most frequently and widely used. Many of them are paralyzed by guilt and shame about their anger and are quick to minimize and suppress anger due to fears of rejection or abandonment. Unhealthy anger management involves attempts to mask, deny, or avoid anger. The purpose of present study is to provide a comprehensive view of anger to help you dealing your angry patients.
Stress and Obesity
Sun-Mi Kim
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):17-20.   Published online November 21, 2004
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Abstract PDF
Stress embraces the reaction to a multitude of poorly defined factors that disturb homeostasis. The activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system has been utilized as objective measurements of stress reactions. Repeated activation of these two stress centres may be involved in the pathogenesis of abdominal obesity and its comorbidities. In population studies adrenal hormones show strong statistical associations to centralization of body fat as well as to obesity. There is considerable evidence from clinical to cellular and molecular studies that elevated cortisol, is causing accumulation of fat in visceral adipose tissues. Glucocorticoid exposure is also followed by increased food intake and leptin resistant obesity perhaps disrupting the balance between leptin and neuropeptide Y to the advantage of the latter. Factors activating the stress centres in humans include psychosocial and socioeconomic handicaps, depressive and anxiety traits, alcohol and smoking, with some differences in profile between personalities and genders.
Stress and Chronic Fatigue
Chul-Whan Kim
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):21-28.   Published online November 21, 2004
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Chronic fatigue(CF) is common symptom and reported in more than 10% of people seen in primary care and also seen in many physical and psychological disease. It is known that CF is related to acute or chronic stress response, although the mechanism is not clear. Many patients who have the stress-related diseases complaint disabilitating fatigue. And the most common risk factor of CF is stress and heavy overwork. Daytime stress cause the sleep disturbances(insomnia or sleep deprivation), and sleep abnormalities cause daytime fatigue and stress also. The relation of stress and CF is explained by biological model of chronic fatigue based on neuroendocrine axis (Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and locus celuleus- norepinephrine(LC/NE) -autonomic system). Chronic fatigue syndrome(CFS) is medically unexplained disorder that has multiple symptoms, especillay CF, cognitive function abnormality and sleep problems. It is well-known that CFS stress sensitive disorder.
Stress Headache
Hyun-Lim Choi
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):29-28.   Published online November 21, 2004
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It is well known that stress can induce or trigger tension headache or migraine. Especially tension headache is known to be so-called "stress headache", which is associated with stress. Tension headache is one of the most common form of headache. They may occur at any age, but is most common in adults and adolescents. Recently the international headache society issued second version of the international classification of headache. It may be generally-accepted classification that is used throughout the world. So I introduce the part of tension headache according to the new classification. Tension headaches result from the contraction of neck and scalp muscles. One cause of this muscle contraction is a response to stress, depression or anxiety. Any activity that causes the head to be held in one position for a long time without moving can cause a headache. Tension headaches are not associated with structural lesions in the brain. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms and prevent future headaches. It is important to learn and stress management strategies such as relaxation exercises, meditation or biofeedback. Adequate sleep and rest or massage of sore muscles can help reduce the chance that a headache will occur. Analgesics with muscle relaxants, anti-anxiety drugs may relieve pain if the above measures are ineffective. Prevention is the best treatment. If possible, it is good to remove or control precipitating factors. Lifestyle changes may be required for chronic tension headaches. This may include adequate rest and exercise, change in job or recreational habits, or other changes.
Understanding and Overcoming of Postpartum Depression: Efficacy of CBT for Postpartum Depression
Hyun-Ju Cho
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):39-50.   Published online November 21, 2004
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Postpartum Depression(PPD) constitutes a general health problem, occurring in 10-15% of delivered mothers. PPD causes women great suffering and has negative consequences for their marital relationship and for the development of their infants. The difficulties that arise in these relationships, often triggered by the depressive episode, mean that the adverse of PPD might be stress to their family. Therefore health professionals have become aware of the importance of intervention on PPD. This study was presented that there were the entity of PPD, related its theory and treatment, especially focused a cognitive-behavioral therapy for PPD. Also, I presented the efficacy of therapy in preventing PPD, and finally hope to ignite interest in a clinic setting as well as in general public for depression prevention.
Neurofeedback: Theory and Practice
Dong-Ku Kim
Korean J Str Res. 2004;12(3):51-54.   Published online November 21, 2004
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