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Yong Hee Kim 5 Articles
The Relationship between Mindfulness and Shame: Moderated Mediating Effect of Self-Blame and Self-Compassion for College Students
Yong Hee Kim
STRESS. 2020;28(1):17-24.   Published online March 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2020.28.1.17
  • 270 View
  • 9 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background

The purpose of this study was to explore the moderated mediating effect of self-compassion through self-blame on the relationship between mindfulness and shame.

Methods

A total of 315 college students participated in this study by completing the following questionnaires: Mindfulness Scale, Depressive Experience Questionnaire, Self-Compassion Scale, State Shame and Guilt Scale. Data were analyzed through SPSS22.0 and its macro. The main findings were as follows.

Results

First, the result of bootstrapping indicated that self-criticism partially mediated the relationship between mindfulness and shame. Second, hierarchical regression and slope analyses revealed the moderating effect of self-compassion on the relationship between self-criticism and shame. Finally, the results indicated that self-compassion moderated the mediating effect of mindfulness on shame through self-criticism.

Conclusions

Contributions of this study to an integrative understanding of the process of self-compassion was considered useful for future therapeutic intervention. Limitation and suggestions was also discussed.

The Effects of Pathological Narcissism on Social Anxiety: Mediation Effects of Difference of Self-Presentational Motivation and Self-Presentational Expectation and Anger Rumination
Yong Hee Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(4):304-312.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.4.304
  • 173 View
  • 3 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of pathological narcissism on social anxiety, and the dual mediating effects of difference of self-presentation motivation and self-presentation expectancies and anger rumination.

Methods:

A total of 307 college students participated in this study by completing the questionnaires and to solve the research questions, AMOS and bootstrapping analysis was employed.

Results:

First, pathological narcissism had a significant interrelation to self-presentation motivation, self-presentation expectancies, anger rumination, and social anxiety. Second, it was confirmed that pathological narcissism affected social anxiety by mediating both difference of self-presentation motivation and self-presentation expectancies and anger rumination. Third, the dual mediating effects of difference of self-presentation motivation and self-presentation expectancies and anger rumination on the relationship between pathological narcissism and social anxiety was found.

Conclusions:

Implication for empirical research and clinical practice regarding treatment of clients with pathological narcissism and social anxiety are discussed. Limitation of current research and suggestions for future study are discussed.

The Effects of Anxious Attachment on Social Anxiety in College Students: Mediation Effects of Self-Esteem, Shame and Narcissistic Vulnerability
Yong Hee Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(2):174-182.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.2.174
  • 231 View
  • 9 Download
  • 2 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study aimed to examine the effect of anxious attachment on social anxiety in college students and to identify the mediation effects of self-esteem, shame and narcissistic vulnerability in using structural equation modeling.

Methods:

College students participated in this study.

Results:

First, all variables in this study had statistically significant correlation. Second, the relationship of anxious attachment and social anxiety was significantly mediated by self –esteem and shame, respectively. Finally, the two serial multiple mediation effects were also significant from anxious attachment to self-esteem, shame and narcissistic vulnerability or social anxiety successively.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that students’ unstable attachment can affect social anxiety or narcissistic vulnerability by mediating negative affect such as low self-esteem and shame. An intervention for students’ social anxiety is important in controlling their mental health.

The Relationship between Unstable Attachment and Subjective Well-Being: Mediating Effect of Decentering and Self-Compassion
Yong Hee Kim
STRESS. 2018;26(4):290-295.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.4.290
  • 164 View
  • 4 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The aim of this study were to investigate the effect of unstable attachment on subjective well-being and to identify mediator effects of decentering and self-compassion.

Methods:

A total of 255 college students participated in this study by completing the following questionnaires: Experience in Close Relationship Scale, Subjective Well-being Questionnaire, Decentering Scale, and Self-Compassion Scale.

Results:

Mediated Regression Analysis was used for the purposes of study. The results are as the following. First, unstable attachment had significant negative correlation with subjective well-being and decentering and self-compassion. Second, decentering had a partial meditational effect on the relation between unstable attachment and subjective well-being. Third, self-compassion had completely meditational effect on the relation between unstable attachment and subjective well-being.

Conclusions:

These results suggested that it is important to enhance students’ level of decentering and self-compassion in order to increase their subjective well-being effectively.

The Relationship between Negative Affect-Intensity and Depression: Moderated Mediating Effect of Self-Compassion through Non-Mentalization
Yong Hee Kim
STRESS. 2018;26(3):201-207.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.3.201
  • 107 View
  • 4 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the moderated mediating effect of self-compassion through non-mentalization on the relationship between negative affect intensity and depression.

Methods:

A total of 289 college students participated in this study by completing the following questionnaires: Affect Intensity Measure, Mentalization Questionnaire, Self-Compassion Scale, and The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale.

Results:

First, all variables in this study were statistically significant correlation. Second, partial mediation effect of non-mentalization on the relationship between negative affect intensity and depression were found. Third, moderation effect of self-compassion on the relationship between non-mentalization and depression were found also. Finally, self-compassion moderated the mediating effect of negative affect intensity on depression through non-mentalization.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that it is important to enhance students’ level of mentalization and self-compassion in order to alleviate their depression. effectively.


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