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Kyung Hyun Suh 2 Articles
Relationships between Self-Criticism, Rejection Sensitivity, Self-Attack, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury
Jae Hee Kim, Kyung Hyun Suh
STRESS. 2021;29(2):122-129.   Published online June 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2021.29.2.122
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  • 3 Download
Abstract PDF
Background

This study aims to investigate the relationships between self-criticism, rejection sensitivity, self-attack, and non-suicidal self-injury among college students, and to verify a path model to predict non-suicidal self-injury.

Methods

The participants were 239 male and female college students who had experienced self-injury. The psychological tests used in this study were the Inventory of Statement about Self-Injury, Form of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassurance Scale, and the Rejection Sensitivity Questionnaire.

Results

Results showed that self-criticism, rejection sensitivity, and self-attack were positively correlated with non-suicidal self-injury, and that rejection sensitivity was positively correlated with self-criticism and self-attack. A model was adopted that includes a direct path from self-criticism to non-suicidal self-injury, while self-criticism and rejection sensitivity affect non-suicidal self-injury indirectly through self-attack.

Conclusions

It was found that rejection sensitivity indirectly affects non-suicidal self-injury through self-attack, and self-criticism directly affects non-suicidal self-injury and indirectly affects non-suicidal self-injury through self-attack.

Relationships between Psychological Characteristics of Golfing, Psychological Protective Factors, and Stresses of Amateur Golfers
Jin Hoon Choi, Kyung Hyun Suh
STRESS. 2019;27(1):91-97.   Published online March 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.1.91
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  • 2 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study aims to explore the relations of psychological characteristics of golfing and psychological protective factors proven in previous studies to golf stresses of amateur golfers.

Methods:

The participants were 204 amateur golfers. Data were analyzed by Pearson product-moment correlation and stepwise regression analysis using SPSS 23.0.

Results:

The results indicated that academic and intuitive approaches styles, golf-efficacy, and physical or social expectancy for golfing were positively correlated with golf stresses. Resilience and self-regulation were negatively correlated with golf stresses. Stepwise regression analysis showed that norm regulation accounted 35.5% variance of golf stresses, and confidence in golf, self-confidence, composure regulation, and cognitive approach to golf were also predictors.

Conclusions:

Since this study has been conducted on an exploratory basis, some results of this study must be reverified, and a number of studies are expected to conduct based on the results.


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