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Kyung Hyun Suh 5 Articles
Developing Smoking Cessation Program for Female Smokers and Assessment of Its Impacts
Kyung Hyun Suh
STRESS. 2023;31(4):189-196.   Published online December 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.4.189
  • 839 View
  • 32 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Female smokers find it challenging to quit smoking. The number of female smokers in Korea has not seen any decline. This study developed a smoking cessation program tailored for female smokers and evaluated its effectiveness.
Methods
The treatment group, which was subjected to the smoking cessation program, was composed of seven adult female smokers and five female college students who smoked. The control group comprised 7 adult female smokers and 5 female college students who wanted to quit smoking.
Results
Of the 12 participants in the control group, only 1 (8.3%) reported that she had maintained abstinence for 4 months and 1 week, while 5 (41.7%; 3 adults and 2 students) out of the 12 in the treatment group managed to abstain. For female smokers in this group, the motivation and empowerment to quit smoking increased significantly after participating in the program, and these positive effects were sustained for up to 3 months after the completion of the program.
Conclusions
Female smokers who participated in the program that was developed as part of this study exhibited a significant abstinence rate, and their motivation and empowerment to quit smoking improved. These results indicate that this smoking cessation program can be clinically useful in helping female smokers quit smoking.
Validation of the Korean Adaptation of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (K-STAXI-2)
Kyum Koo Chon, Kyung Hyun Suh, Joonsuk YI, Sungwon Roh, Yongmi Lee, Sojung Kim, Euiyeon Kim, Ju Yul Lee, Aron Choi
STRESS. 2023;31(3):133-141.   Published online September 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.3.133
  • 1,101 View
  • 98 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to validate the Korean adaptation of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (K-STAXI-2).
Methods
The study included a sample of 307 normal adults and 81 comparable adult patients. The data were analyzed using factor analyses, internal consistency measures, assessments of convergent and discriminant validity, t-tests between groups, and test-retest reliability.
Results
(1) Exploratory factor analyses revealed clear-cut factors for anger experience (state anger and trait anger) and anger expression (anger expression-in, anger expression-out, anger control-in, and anger control-out); (2) correlation analyses between K-STAXI-2 and the Emotional Stress Inventory demonstrated convergent and discriminant validity; (3) t-test between the patient group and the normal adults group provided additional construct validity; (4) internal consistencies of the six subscales showed a satisfactory level of reliability (α=.81 to α=.94); and (5) test-retest reliability over four weeks showed a satisfactory level of reliability.
Conclusions
The results further support the reliability and validity of the K-STAXI-2, suggesting its usefulness in various fields such as medicine, nursing, psychology, addiction, organization, education, and criminal justice.
Development and Validation of a Brief Measure of Hardiness for the Korean Population
Kyung Hyun Suh
STRESS. 2022;30(2):60-68.   Published online June 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2022.30.2.60
  • 2,205 View
  • 57 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background
This study developed and validated a brief tool to efficiently measure hardiness in the Korean population, considering that no such valid tool is available in Korean.
Methods
Data for item analysis and exploratory factor analysis were obtained from 343 college students and data for internal consistency and confirmatory factor analyses were obtained from 570 college students. Test-retest reliability, convergent validity, and criterion-related validity were determined.
Results
Excellent model fits were shown for the 12-item brief measure of hardiness (BMH) with the following three factors: commitment (e.g., “When I open my eyes in the morning, I look forward to the day.”), self-directedness (e.g., “My decisions shape my life.”), tenacity (e.g., “I believe that failure is the mother of success.”). Each subscale consists of four items, using a six-point Likert scale. Cronbach’s α for commitment, self-directedness, tenacity, and the total BMH were .91, .85, .89, and .88, respectively. The BMH test−retest coefficient was .77, suggesting reliabilty of this tool. Analyses of the criterion− related validity revealed that the the BMH score was reasonably correlated with the scores on some sub-scales of the Personality Assessment Inventory.
Conclusions
Although other standardized scales may be required for diagnostic purposes, this study highlights the utility of the BMH as a brief and useful tool with relatively simple items to measure hardiness as a personality trait in the Korean population for research purposes.

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  • Hardiness and Expectations for Future Life: The Roles of Perceived Stress, Music Listening for Negative Emotion Regulation, and Life Satisfaction
    Alexander Park, Kyung-Hyun Suh
    Behavioral Sciences.2023; 13(10): 852.     CrossRef
Relationships between Self-Criticism, Rejection Sensitivity, Self-Attack, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury
Jae Hee Kim, Kyung Hyun Suh
STRESS. 2021;29(2):122-129.   Published online June 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2021.29.2.122
  • 2,689 View
  • 100 Download
Abstract PDF
Background

This study aims to investigate the relationships between self-criticism, rejection sensitivity, self-attack, and non-suicidal self-injury among college students, and to verify a path model to predict non-suicidal self-injury.

Methods

The participants were 239 male and female college students who had experienced self-injury. The psychological tests used in this study were the Inventory of Statement about Self-Injury, Form of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassurance Scale, and the Rejection Sensitivity Questionnaire.

Results

Results showed that self-criticism, rejection sensitivity, and self-attack were positively correlated with non-suicidal self-injury, and that rejection sensitivity was positively correlated with self-criticism and self-attack. A model was adopted that includes a direct path from self-criticism to non-suicidal self-injury, while self-criticism and rejection sensitivity affect non-suicidal self-injury indirectly through self-attack.

Conclusions

It was found that rejection sensitivity indirectly affects non-suicidal self-injury through self-attack, and self-criticism directly affects non-suicidal self-injury and indirectly affects non-suicidal self-injury through self-attack.

Relationships between Psychological Characteristics of Golfing, Psychological Protective Factors, and Stresses of Amateur Golfers
Jin Hoon Choi, Kyung Hyun Suh
STRESS. 2019;27(1):91-97.   Published online March 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.1.91
  • 996 View
  • 11 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study aims to explore the relations of psychological characteristics of golfing and psychological protective factors proven in previous studies to golf stresses of amateur golfers.

Methods:

The participants were 204 amateur golfers. Data were analyzed by Pearson product-moment correlation and stepwise regression analysis using SPSS 23.0.

Results:

The results indicated that academic and intuitive approaches styles, golf-efficacy, and physical or social expectancy for golfing were positively correlated with golf stresses. Resilience and self-regulation were negatively correlated with golf stresses. Stepwise regression analysis showed that norm regulation accounted 35.5% variance of golf stresses, and confidence in golf, self-confidence, composure regulation, and cognitive approach to golf were also predictors.

Conclusions:

Since this study has been conducted on an exploratory basis, some results of this study must be reverified, and a number of studies are expected to conduct based on the results.


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