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Jung-Ho Kim 5 Articles
The Comparison of Effects of Mindfulness Meditation Group Therapy and Mindfulness Meditation Group Therapy Added Self-Compassion Meditation for the Female Patients Suffering from Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain
Yena Park, Jung-Ho Kim, Mirihae Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(4):412-421.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.4.412
  • 135 View
  • 19 Download
Abstract PDF
Background:

Choric Musculoskeletal pain patients suffer from emotional distress such as depression and anxiety and also experience much more discomfort in their lives. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a Mindfulness meditation group therapy and Mindfulness meditation group therapy added Compassion meditation on pain, quality of life, and psychological features in Chronic Musculoskeletal pain patients.

Methods:

20 participants received 7 weekly sessions in mindfulness meditation training program, which take about 90 minutes each. Only Compassion Meditation group received 20 minutes added program. Measures included Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Quality of life (WHOQOL-BRIF), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Y (STAI-Y), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-16 (AAQ-16), Experiences Questionnaire (EQ), Life Satisfaction Expectancy scales (LSES). All the variables were measured at three time points: pre, post, and follow up implementation.

Results:

The t-test results of the participants before and after the Mindfulness Meditation group showed statistically significant improvement in their Pain (t=2.64, p<.05), Depression (t=5.579, p<.05), and State Anxiety (t=2.223, p<.05), but not in another positive psychological features. Added Compassion Meditation group showed statistically significant improvement all of measures (Pain: t=3.180, p<.01, Quality of life: t=4.781, p<.01, Depression: t=2.208, p<.01, State Anxiety: t=3.838, p<.01, Trait Anxiety: t=3.208, p<.01, Acceptance: t=−2.635, p<.05, Experience: t=−3.041, p<.01, Life satisfaction: t=−2.23, p<.05). The follow-up implementation showed the persistence of beneficial changes.

Conclusions:

Added compassion meditation is more effective than mindfulness meditation for chronic musculoskeletal pain. There are greater benefits for alleviating pain, improving quality of life and other psychological features that can be gained from performing added compassion meditation rather than doing mindfulness meditation solely.

The Effects of Self-Compassion Program on Internalized Shame and Subjective Well-Being in Female University Students with Depressive Mood
Min Jeong Kang, Jung-Ho Kim, Mirihae Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(4):464-471.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.4.464
  • 180 View
  • 5 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of self-compassion program on depressive mood, internalized shame and subjective well-being in female university students with depressive Mood.

Methods:

Two groups are composed of experimental group (N=14) which is divided to High Shame Group (N=7), Low Shame Group (N=7) and control group (N=8) composed of High Shame Group (N=4), Low Shame Group (N=4). The experimental group participated twice a week, 60-minute Self-Compassion program session during 3 week.

Results:

First, Experimental group is lower depressive mood, internalized shame and higher life satisfaction expectancy than control group. But, There were no significant differences in life satisfaction, positive affect in experimental group. Second, Self compassion program is effective two group, High shame group and Low shame group.

Conclusions:

The finding supports the effect of Self-Compassion Program on depressive mood, internalized shame, subjective wellbeing.

The Development and Validation of the Relational Need Scales
Soo-Hyun Kang, Jung-Ho Kim, Mirihae Kim
STRESS. 2019;27(1):107-116.   Published online March 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2019.27.1.107
  • 123 View
  • 2 Download
Abstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background:

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the relational need scale. Based on previous studies, we presumed that relational need is comprised of the two independent concepts of approch and avoidance.

Methods:

The preliminary items were selected through a series of processes and they were analyzed in terms of item content, response distribution and correlations with other measures. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed that approach and avoidance concepts were independent from each other.

Results:

As a result, the relational need scale was developed, consisting of 6 approach-type items for the relational need subscale and 11 items for the avoidance-type subscale. The two subscales are each subsumed by a one-factor model and a three-factor model, respectively. Specifically, the approach- type subscale has subfactors of ‘Intimate relationship tendency,’ whereas the avoidance-type subscale has the subfactors of ‘sensitivity to others evaluations,’ ‘sensitive to negative evaluations,’ and ‘awareness for others.’

Conclusions:

The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and criterion-related validity of the scales were found to be adequate. This study revealed that the Korean version of relational need scale is reliable and valid. Finally, implications and limitations of this study and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

The Effects of a Self-Compassion Program on Body Satisfaction, Body Shame, Self-Esteem and Subjective Well-Being among Female University Students with Negative Body Image
Ye Ji Kwon, Jung-Ho Kim, Mirihae Kim
STRESS. 2018;26(4):296-304.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2018.26.4.296
  • 264 View
  • 17 Download
  • 4 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Self-Compassion Program on body satisfaction, body shame, self-esteem and subjective well-being among female university students with negative body image.

Methods:

Study participants were composed of the top 35% of female college students on negative body image. The 25 participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (n=13) or a control group (n=12). The treatment group participated in weekly, 60-minute Self-Compassion Program sessions in a group format over a 6-week period.

Results:

Reports of body dissatisfaction and body shame decreased significantly more in the treatment group compared to the control group, while self-esteem, life satisfaction, and expected life satisfaction scores increased significantly more in the treatment group compared to the control group. There were no significant differences in positive affect and negative affect between groups at post treatment. The one-month follow-up results showed that the beneficial improvements were maintained.

Conclusions:

The findings support the efficacy of the Self-Compassion Program on body dissatisfaction, body shame and self-esteem.

The Effects of the Motivation Management Program on Stress Response, Self-Efficacy and Subjective Well-Being among Female University Students with Academic and Career Stress
Ji-Hye Jang, Jung-Ho Kim, Mirihae Kim
STRESS. 2017;25(4):317-325.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2017.25.4.317
  • 138 View
  • 3 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Background:

This study examined the effects of the Motivation Management Program on stress response (somatization, depression, and anger), self-efficacy and subjective well-being among female university students with academic and career stress.

Methods:

The participants were assigned to either a treatment group (N=12) or a control group (N=13). The Motivation Management Program treatment group was administered 6 sessions (80 minutes each, once a week).

Results:

The Stress Response, Somatization, Depression, Anger and Negative Affect scores in the treatment group decreased significantly compared with those in the control group, while the Satisfaction with Life and Positive Affect scores in treatment group increased significantly in comparison with those in the control group. No significant pre-post differences were found between groups in Self-Efficacy and Life Satisfaction Expectancy scores.

Conclusions:

The findings suggest that the motivation management program can help female University students reduce the stress response (somatization, depression, and anger) and improve the subjective well-being.


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