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Hae Youn Choi 2 Articles
Effect of Work Overload on Job Burnout: The Moderation Effect of Problem-Focused Coping and Job Autonomy
Jae Won Moon, Hae Youn Choi
STRESS. 2023;31(3):106-112.   Published online September 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2023.31.3.106
  • 931 View
  • 53 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
In the contemporary work environment marked by specialization, digitalization, and convergence, job burnout has intensified. This study aims to validate the intricate interplay between individuals and their environment in progression from high-skilled, unstructured job stress.
Methods
This study explores the moderating effects of problem-focused coping and job autonomy on the relationship between work overload and job burnout. The participant pool comprised 150 employees (mean age=40.7, 68.7% women) stationed at large commercial bank branches in Korea.
Results
First, the study did not uncover a statistically significant moderation effect of problem-focused coping on the relationship between work overload and job burnout. Second, the findings revealed that the impact of work overload on job burnout displayed variation contingent upon the levels of problem-focused coping and job autonomy.
Conclusions
This study underscores the pivotal role of ensuring job autonomy within the work environment to effectively mitigate the adverse effects of excessive work situations through problem-focused coping.
Distractive Emotion Regulation: The Construct and Its Measurement
Dohyeon Kim, Hae Youn Choi
STRESS. 2021;29(1):11-20.   Published online March 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17547/kjsr.2021.29.1.11
  • 2,320 View
  • 47 Download
Abstract PDF
Background

Distractive emotion regulation, which relieves arousal through attention shift, protects individuals from strong stress. Distractive emotion regulation is widely used in everyday life and although it has great implications in the context of adaptation such as to addiction, it is generally not considered separately from avoidant regulation, it has neither been clearly defined nor measured.

Methods

Through a literature review and qualitative analysis, we selected adults’ distractive emotion regulation behaviors. We explored the construct by developing measurement on the distractive behaviors that adults use to regulate emotion.

Results

Factor analysis revealed that distractive emotion regulation consisted of four factors: “consumption distraction” concerned with activities such as shopping, internet use, and TV viewing; “arousal control distraction” related to activities such as exercise, bathing, and deep breathing; “reserving distraction” pertaining to activities such as eating, sleeping, and listening to music; and “aggressive distraction” involving behaviors such as bullying, physical destructiveness, or cursing. Each factor had a different correlation with stress coping dimensions and subjective well-being.

Conclusions

Distractive emotion regulation is a multidimensional concept composed of sub-factors with different functions and clinical implications in daily life.


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